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1. Japan

01-Matcha-green-tea-japan
Matcha is a powdered green tea from Japan using finely ground, high-quality green tea leaves. It’s traditionally used in Japanese tea ceremonies.

2. India

02-masala-tea-chai-india
India has a rich and diverse tea history, with traditional masala chai tea being served through South Asia for thousands of years before the tea industry exploded during the British colonial era. Pictured above is the white leaf Darjeeling tea, which grows wild in India.

3. Britain

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Black tea in the UK can be served on its own or with milk and/or sugar and is taken several times a day. Aim for a golden colour when pouring you milk, and for the love of god, brew the tea first.

4. Turkey

Traditional Turkish Tea
Turkish coffee may be the country’s most famous warm drink, but cay tea is its most popular, served with every meal, and often in between. The black tea doesn’t take milk, but can be served with or without sugar and is usually brewed in a really confusing two-chamber pot.

5. Tibet

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Tibetan po cha, or butter tea, combines tea, salt, and yak butter. The tea is brewed for several hours to get a bitter taste, then churned with butter and salt directly before serving. Try it yourself with this recipe.

6. Morocco

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Spearmint is steeped in green tea for this drink, popular in Morocco and across much of North Africa.

7. Hong Kong

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Famous in Hong Kong is iced milk tea known as pantyhose tea or silk stocking tea because it’s similar in colour to nude stockings, no joke. To make, combine strong chilled black tea with evaporated or condensed milk and serve over ice.

8. Taiwan

08-taiwan-Bubble-Tea
Pearl milk tea, aka bubble tea, has become a worldwide phenomenon, but it has its roots in Taiwan. It can be served hot or cold, and typically over tapioca pearls cooked in sugar syrup. Basically once you’ve had bubble tea, you’ll never need a Frappuccino again. Use this recipe to make your own.

9. USA

09-usa-sweet-iced-tea-lemonslice
Sweet iced tea is the lifeblood of the American South. Usually made using strong-brewed Lipton tea and sugar, you can add lemon, or a pinch of baking soda for smoothness.

10. Russia

10-russian-tea-samovar
For a cup of Russian tea, several types of black leaves are brewed separately and then mixed in the cup. Like Turkey, Russia traditionally uses a multi-chamber pot, called a samovar, with a chamber for water and a chamber for brewing the tea.

11. Pakistan

11-pakistani-Masala-Chai-tea
Chai isn’t exclusive to India. Spicy and creamy masala chai is a favourite for Pakistani afternoon tea, and you can use basic English breakfast tea as a base.

12. Thailand

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Cha yen is Thailand’s take on iced milk tea, and it combines condensed milk and brewed Thai Tea Mix.

13. China

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The Chinese love their tea, and drink a wide range of flavours and colours. Pictured is yellow leaf pu-erh tea, which is packaged in bricks or balls, crumbled into the cup, and steeped in hot water.

14. Malaysia

14-Kopi-Cham-drink-coffee-tea
Malaysia has perfected the tea needed for all deserts and snacks. Shown is Kopi Cham, a drink of coffee plus tea, commonly served hot or iced in Malaysia.

15. Mongolia

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Suutei tsai is cooked in a flat pan with milk and salt. The savoury tea is served in a shallow metal bowl with most meals.

16. Egypt

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Egyptians are well-known for being big tea drinkers. Their national Egyptian drink is called Karkadeh tea, which is a sweet-sour drink of bright red color, made of dried Sudanese rose flower bracts. You can drink it both hot and cold.

17. Argentina

17-argentina-yerba-mate-cup
Yerba mate is a vitamin-packed green tea grown and drunk throughout South America, as well as in Portugal, Lebanon, and Syria. It has a signature smoky flavour and can be served hot or cold.

18. South Africa

18-south-africa-rooibos-tea
The Rooibos plant produces a bright red tea, and is found exclusively in South Africa. Typically served on its own without sugar or milk, the tea has a naturally mild and sweet flavour, and is a great before bed cuppa.

19. Qatar

19-qatar-tea-chai
In Qatar, strong milky tea called karak chai is a nationwide favourite. Black tea leaves are boiled in water, mixed with evaporated milk and sugar, and boiled a second time.

20. Mauritania

20-mauritania-tea
Mauritania’s version of the popular north African mint green tea has a specific serving ritual. Drinkers take three cups each, increasing the sweetness of every new cup, so you start bitter and end sweet.

Share you favourite way of tea drinking!

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The fans of Yerba Mate have been growing rainforests with Guayaki’s Tiny Foot print Coffee which is fair trade coffee, by planting a tree for each pound of beans that they sell.

This green practice makes this the world’s first coffee that offsets the negative effects of carbon. The roasting and shipping of one pound of coffee adds about 4 pounds of the equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2e) in the atmosphere.

However, the planting of trees which grow fast in the Ecuadorian cloud forest removes 54 pounds of CO2e. According to Tiny Footprint Coffee, that for every pound of coffee sold, there is 50 pounds of negative carbon goodness.

However, the trees that are planted have to suck up CO2 for 20 years in order to reach that figure of 54 pounds. Also there is much more to consider about the coffee’s carbon footprint than simply the roasting and shipping.

For instance, in your home the process of brewing the beverage and the grinding of coffee beans creates somewhere between 0.04 and 0.7 pounds of CO2e, depending on what you add to the coffee and how you heat your water. Because each pound of coffee is good for approximately fifty cups of coffee there is somewhere between 2.3 and 35 additional pounds of emission of CO2e for each pound of coffee that you purchase.

Although Tiny Footprint Coffee is 90% fair trade certified and all organic, the other 10% of coffees that are fair trade and are non certified that come from family farms that are small and aren’t eligible for certification of fair trade since they aren’t a part of a large growing cooperative.

However, they do grow sustainable, premium, and beautiful coffees that people pay above fair trade price to get. Also those numbers don’t include the widely varying farming practices that can affect the carbon footprint of growing a cup of coffee. People always buy organic coffees that are sustainably grown but aren’t limited to only reach certified fair trade coffees.

As far as the claims of the carbon negative, the CO2e calculations made by Tiny Footprint should be taken with a grain of salt. In addition, they are hard to compare with other coffee companies that are planting trees.

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There are many countries in the world, every of which has its own national drink, some even have more than one. Here you will find the most unusual of national drinks.

1. Brazil National Drink
Yerba Mate or hierba mate or erva mate, in Portuguese (Ilex paraguariensis), or sometimes called simply mate, is a species of holly (family Aquifoliaceae) native to subtropical South America in northern Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and southern Brazil and Bolivia. It is used as a herbal tea.

Mate drinking
As with other brewed herbs, yerba mate leaves are dried, chopped, and ground into a powdery mixture. Unlike other brews, however, mate is traditionally sipped from a dried and carefully carved, hollow calabash, through a special metal straw (traditionally silver) called a bombilla. Bombilla usually means “light bulb” in Spanish, but locally it is “little pump” or “straw”.

Preparing the Mate
The method of preparing the mate infusion varies considerably from region to region, and it is hotly debated which method yields the finest outcome. However, nearly all methods have some common elements: the gourd is packed with an abundant amount of yerba, and very hot water (typically from 70–80 degrees Celsius [160–180 degrees Fahrenheit] and never boiling) is added.

2. Nicaragua National Drinks
Here are many national drinks that you will enjoy when you go to Nicaragua.
Some of them are: Fresh tropical fruit juice, Chicha de maíz and de jengibre (in order to make this drink you have to boil corn and then grind it with food coloring), Tiste (this is another unusual drink that you will have the opportunity to taste. It is made from corn and cocoa drink.
Another original drink is cacao. This is actually one of the favorite drinks in the world.

Here goes, a sampling of some of the more unusual national drinks.

3. Sosro Tehbotol National Drink
This is basically sweetened jasmine tea from Indonesia. It has a crisp, clean taste, flowery. It’s an iced tea, but doesn’t need lemon.

4. De Sarro & Torchia BibiCaffe National Drink
This is a carbonated, concentrated coffee. Espresso, caramel, vanilla with bubbles. Not too sweet, a bit of a kick, almost chocolaty. Cute small bottle. One of the best drinks.

5. Almdudler National Drink
Almdudler is the national soft drink of Austria. Tastes like a light lemonade with a sour apple flavor. The bottle design is pretty sharp, with two Almdudler-holics in funky hats looking straight from a Tin-Tin comic.

6. Fentiman’s: Five interesting flavors
Fentimans is a British maker of botanically brewed, slightly fermented beverages. These are microbrewed, hand crafted soda for grownups.

7. China Cola National Drink
A real novelty, this is a cola where the flavor is created by a careful mix of Chinese herbs. Seems like a lot of effort for what’s basically a coke.

8. Sprecher’s Orange Dream National Drink
From Wisconsin, this microbrewed orange soda comes in a hefty bottle with a cow mascot. It’s an orange cream with vanilla and honey.

9. Kombucha Wonder Drink
This Kombucha Wonder Drink is described as “A Sparkling Himalayan Tonic” and a “blend of jasmine tea with essence of Niagara grape”. It’s a kind of sweet and sour, like a musky grape juice. Kombucha is some kind of funky mushroom.

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ScienceDaily (Jun. 17, 2008) — A new study has good news for coffee drinkers: Regular coffee drinking (up to 6 cups per day) is not associated with increased deaths in either men or women.

In fact, both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with a somewhat smaller rate of death from heart disease.

“Coffee consumption has been linked to various beneficial and detrimental health effects, but data on its relation with death were lacking,” says Esther Lopez-Garcia, PhD, the study’s lead author. “Coffee consumption was not associated with a higher risk of mortality in middle-aged men and women. The possibility of a modest benefit of coffee consumption on heart disease, cancer, and other causes of death needs to be further investigated.”

Women consuming two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day had a 25 percent lower risk of death from heart disease during the follow-up period (which lasted from 1980 to 2004 and involved 84,214 women) as compared with non-consumers, and an 18 percent lower risk of death caused by something other than cancer or heart disease as compared with non-consumers during follow-up.

For men, this level of consumption was associated with neither a higher nor a lower risk of death during the follow-up period (which lasted from 1986 to 2004 and involved 41,736 men).

The researchers analyzed data of 84,214 women who had participated in the Nurses’ Health Study and 41,736 men who had participated in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. To be in the current study, participants had to have been free of cancer and heart disease at the start of those larger studies.

The study participants completed questionnaires every two to four years that included questions about how frequently they drank coffee, other diet habits, smoking, and health conditions. The researchers then compared the frequency of death from any cause, death due to heart disease, and death due to cancer among people with different coffee-drinking habits.

Among women, 2,368 deaths were due to heart disease, 5,011 were due to cancer, and 3,716 were due to another cause. Among men, 2,049 deaths were due to heart disease, 2,491 were due to cancer, and 2,348 were due to another cause.

While accounting for other risk factors, such as body size, smoking, diet, and specific diseases, the researchers found that people who drank more coffee were less likely to die during the follow-up period. This was mainly because of lower risk for heart disease deaths among coffee drinkers.

The researchers found no association between coffee drinking and cancer deaths. These relationships did not seem to be related to caffeine because people who drank decaffeinated coffee also had lower death rates than people who did not drink coffee.

The editors of Annals of Internal Medicine caution that the design of the study does not make it certain that coffee decreases the chances of dying sooner than expected. Something else about coffee drinkers might be protecting them. And some measurement error in the assessment of coffee consumption is inevitable because estimated consumption came from self-reports.

This study was supported by National Institutes of Health research grants.

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Black tea promotes healthy arteries and increased blood flow due to antioxidants called falconoids, which give tea its flavor. Cholesterol levels drop as tea consumption increases. Tea is reported to reduce the risk of cancer, yield fresher breath and fewer cavities, and help build bones. It also contains approximately half the caffeine of coffee, and is a rich source of vitamins and minerals.

Making a Cup of Black Tea

The single most important thing to remember in all of this process is heat. The tea leafs impart their taste to the water most effectively when the water is actually boiling. To make really good tea you must go to every length possible to exclude coldness from the equation.

Tea in the cup is easy. If someone asks you for a cup of black tea and you put a bag in a cup and add boiling water no one is going to complain. However… to make a REALLY GOOD cup of black tea…

Boil a kettle with freshly drawn COLD water. Add a little boiling water to the empty tea cup to warm it. Put a single bag of black tea into the bottom of the cup making certain that the tea takes up as much of the visible surface area as possible.

When the water is boiling pour it into the cup by taking the kettle to the cup and trying to make certain that as much boiling water hits as much tea as soon as possible. Leave to infuse. The tea in tea bags is so fine that two minutes should see you right.

Always take out the tea bag before giving the cup to someone else especially since if you leave a tea bag in then soon enough all the air caught within it will escape and the tea bag will sink to the bottom of the cup where it will lie in wait for the unwary and then, just as you move to drain the last dregs of the drink, it will rush from the darkness like a some satanic seal desperate to invade your mouth and propigate it’s evil children in the cavities of your cheeks. Well may be it’s not that bad, but it is really unpleasant to get that big cold wet kiss of a sulking tea bag.

Don’t add sugar. Sugar is unnecessary, unhealthy and masks the delicious flavor of tea. Most importantly when making a cup of black tea is NEVER “top up” a cup with more water. “Topping up” does not make more black tea in the cup it makes the same amount of tea diluted with more water. This will kill the taste of your tea and make you generally hated by all right minded tea drinkers. Be prepared when adding the water first – realize that you will have to take the tea bag out and realize that you will probably need to leave a little room for milk.

People drink Black tea with sugar, milk and syrups. In the US and Europe people often just want a slice of Lemon with their black tea.

People all over the world always choose drinking tea with cookies, sweets or cakes sitting in front of the TV or talking to friends.

Black Tea Recipes

Iced Black Tea

Pour one cup of boiling water over two tea bags, let steep for 3 to 5 minutes. For stronger flavor, steep longer, or use more tea bags. Remove and squeeze out tea bags. Add ice and enjoy. Make a larger quantity using more tea bags and water, and refrigerate the rest to drink throughout the day.

Egg Nog Delight

  • 6 Red Rose English Breakfast tea bags
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 can (14 oz.) sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 quart milk
  • 1/2 pint whipping cream
  • Ground nutmeg

Brew Red Rose tea bags in 1 cup boiling water. Steep for 5 minutes. Remove tea bags. Cool tea. Add beaten eggs, condensed milk, vanilla, salt, tea, milk and mix well. Serve in mugs. Top each mug with whipping cream and ground nutmeg.

Earl Grey Punch

  • 1 and 1/4 cups of brewed Earl Grey (made with two tbsps. leaves)
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 1/4 cups of orange juice
  • 1/2 cups apple juice
  • 1 cup gingerale
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 sprigs of mint (optional)
  • Dark rum to taste (optional)

Mix all ingredients together leaving out the ice cubes. Chill in refrigerator. Remove mint, add ice cubes and serve.

Enjoy your favorite Black Tea!

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