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Soda

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Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

The campaign called GULP – Give Up Loving Pop – has been created by the Health Equalities Group, based in Liverpool, which is supported by the NHS and local authorities.

GULP also highlights links between the drinks and tooth decay and type 2 diabetes.

Sugar has been labelled the ‘new tobacco’ by some health experts, who warn it is fuelling a national obesity epidemic, particularly among children.
A number of campaigning organisations are supporting the idea of a tax on sugary drinks both to reduce consumption and raise money to support health and sports schemes for youngsters.

Recent research by the University of Liverpool claimed that added a 20p tax to the drinks would save thousands of children from diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

They argued such a levy would prevent 1,100 cases of cancer in London alone, as well as reducing the number of people who develop diabetes by 6,300 and cut the number of people suffering from coronary heart disease or strokes by 4,300.

Based on these figures, it seems tens of thousands of cases of disease could be prevented if the 20p per litre tax was adopted across the entire UK.

Over 60 organisations – including Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, British Dietetic Association, CitizensUK, Faculty of Public Health, Netmums and Unison – have already backed the campaign for a sugary drinks tax.

Supporters also include Rosie Boycott, who was appointed by the mayor of London, Boris Johnson, to run the London Food Board.
Soft drinks are the largest single source of sugar for children aged 4-10 years and teenagers.

A tax of 20p a litre would add around 7p to the price of a standard can of Coca-Cola or Pepsi.

Director of the GULP campaign, Robin Ireland, said: ‘Few people fully realise the harm that sugary drinks can do to your health.

‘As well as damaging your teeth, overconsumption of these drinks can lead to weight gain, type 2 diabetes and poor heart health.

‘Given the levels of overweight and obesity across the UK, in particular amongst youngsters, unless we start to take action on sugary drinks we will be storing up problems for future generations.

‘As sugary drinks manufacturers seem less-than-willing to inform the public about the health harms associated with overconsumption of their products we’ve launched our Gulp campaign to get the message across and take the fight to the manufacturers.’

He added: ‘With 40per cent of young people reportedly drinking three or more glasses of sugary drinks per day it is vital that we a send a message to Government about the damage that is being done to the health of our children and young people and the need for education on healthier alternatives.’
However, the director general of the British Soft Drinks Association, Gavin Partington, accused the campaign of ‘scaremongering.’

He said: ‘If these campaigners were genuinely interested in public health they would be seeking to educate all consumers about the importance of a balanced diet and physical exercise rather than erroneously targeting one product category and making claims not supported by the evidence.’

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1. Japan

01-Matcha-green-tea-japan
Matcha is a powdered green tea from Japan using finely ground, high-quality green tea leaves. It’s traditionally used in Japanese tea ceremonies.

2. India

02-masala-tea-chai-india
India has a rich and diverse tea history, with traditional masala chai tea being served through South Asia for thousands of years before the tea industry exploded during the British colonial era. Pictured above is the white leaf Darjeeling tea, which grows wild in India.

3. Britain

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Black tea in the UK can be served on its own or with milk and/or sugar and is taken several times a day. Aim for a golden colour when pouring you milk, and for the love of god, brew the tea first.

4. Turkey

Traditional Turkish Tea
Turkish coffee may be the country’s most famous warm drink, but cay tea is its most popular, served with every meal, and often in between. The black tea doesn’t take milk, but can be served with or without sugar and is usually brewed in a really confusing two-chamber pot.

5. Tibet

05-tibetian-butter-tea
Tibetan po cha, or butter tea, combines tea, salt, and yak butter. The tea is brewed for several hours to get a bitter taste, then churned with butter and salt directly before serving. Try it yourself with this recipe.

6. Morocco

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Spearmint is steeped in green tea for this drink, popular in Morocco and across much of North Africa.

7. Hong Kong

07-hong-kong-ice-milk-tea
Famous in Hong Kong is iced milk tea known as pantyhose tea or silk stocking tea because it’s similar in colour to nude stockings, no joke. To make, combine strong chilled black tea with evaporated or condensed milk and serve over ice.

8. Taiwan

08-taiwan-Bubble-Tea
Pearl milk tea, aka bubble tea, has become a worldwide phenomenon, but it has its roots in Taiwan. It can be served hot or cold, and typically over tapioca pearls cooked in sugar syrup. Basically once you’ve had bubble tea, you’ll never need a Frappuccino again. Use this recipe to make your own.

9. USA

09-usa-sweet-iced-tea-lemonslice
Sweet iced tea is the lifeblood of the American South. Usually made using strong-brewed Lipton tea and sugar, you can add lemon, or a pinch of baking soda for smoothness.

10. Russia

10-russian-tea-samovar
For a cup of Russian tea, several types of black leaves are brewed separately and then mixed in the cup. Like Turkey, Russia traditionally uses a multi-chamber pot, called a samovar, with a chamber for water and a chamber for brewing the tea.

11. Pakistan

11-pakistani-Masala-Chai-tea
Chai isn’t exclusive to India. Spicy and creamy masala chai is a favourite for Pakistani afternoon tea, and you can use basic English breakfast tea as a base.

12. Thailand

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Cha yen is Thailand’s take on iced milk tea, and it combines condensed milk and brewed Thai Tea Mix.

13. China

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The Chinese love their tea, and drink a wide range of flavours and colours. Pictured is yellow leaf pu-erh tea, which is packaged in bricks or balls, crumbled into the cup, and steeped in hot water.

14. Malaysia

14-Kopi-Cham-drink-coffee-tea
Malaysia has perfected the tea needed for all deserts and snacks. Shown is Kopi Cham, a drink of coffee plus tea, commonly served hot or iced in Malaysia.

15. Mongolia

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Suutei tsai is cooked in a flat pan with milk and salt. The savoury tea is served in a shallow metal bowl with most meals.

16. Egypt

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Egyptians are well-known for being big tea drinkers. Their national Egyptian drink is called Karkadeh tea, which is a sweet-sour drink of bright red color, made of dried Sudanese rose flower bracts. You can drink it both hot and cold.

17. Argentina

17-argentina-yerba-mate-cup
Yerba mate is a vitamin-packed green tea grown and drunk throughout South America, as well as in Portugal, Lebanon, and Syria. It has a signature smoky flavour and can be served hot or cold.

18. South Africa

18-south-africa-rooibos-tea
The Rooibos plant produces a bright red tea, and is found exclusively in South Africa. Typically served on its own without sugar or milk, the tea has a naturally mild and sweet flavour, and is a great before bed cuppa.

19. Qatar

19-qatar-tea-chai
In Qatar, strong milky tea called karak chai is a nationwide favourite. Black tea leaves are boiled in water, mixed with evaporated milk and sugar, and boiled a second time.

20. Mauritania

20-mauritania-tea
Mauritania’s version of the popular north African mint green tea has a specific serving ritual. Drinkers take three cups each, increasing the sweetness of every new cup, so you start bitter and end sweet.

Share you favourite way of tea drinking!

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The recipe for a hyperactive middle schooler? Just add energy drink.

Children who had at least one energy drink were 66% more likely to report symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention than those who had not, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health found.

The same was not true for sugary sodas or sports drinks, explained lead researcher Jeannette Ickovics.

The more sugary beverages in general a kid had, the greater the risk for symptoms of hyperactivity — but energy drinks had an impact even if a child only drank one.

“Parents should restrict their children from (having) all sugar-sweetened beverages, and especially energy drinks,” Ickovics said.

The Yale researchers surveyed more than 1,600 Connecticut middle schoolers.

The popularity of products like Red Bull, Monster and Five Hour Energy is on the rise among kids — in the Yale study, one out of seven students reported having an energy drink the day before.

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Around 90 percent of Americans consume caffeine in one form or another every single day. More than half of all American adults consume more than 300 milligrams (mg) of caffeine every day, making it America’s most popular drug by far. The caffeine comes in from things like coffee, tea, cola, chocolate, etc.

Have you ever wondered what it is that makes caffeine so popular? What does this drug do that causes its use to be so widespread? In this article, you will learn all about caffeine.

What Is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a drug that is naturally produced in the leaves and seeds of many plants. It’s also produced artificially and added to certain foods. It’s part of the same group of drugs sometimes used to treat asthma.

Caffeine is defined as a drug because it stimulates the central nervous system, causing increased heart rate and alertness. Most people who are sensitive to caffeine experience a temporary increase in energy and elevation in mood.

Caffeine is an addictive drug. Among its many actions, it operates using the same mechanisms that amphetamines, cocaine, and heroin use to stimulate the brain. On a spectrum, caffeine’s effects are more mild than amphetamines, cocaine and heroin, but it is manipulating the same channels, and that is one of the things that gives caffeine its addictive qualities. If you feel like you cannot function without it and must consume it every day, then you are addicted to caffeine.

Products containing caffeine

Caffeine is in tea leaves, coffee beans, chocolate, many soft drinks, pain relievers, and other over-the-counter pills. In its natural form, caffeine tastes very bitter. But most caffeinated drinks have gone through enough processing to camouflage the bitter taste. Most teens get the majority of their caffeine intake through soft drinks, which can also have added sugar and artificial flavors.

Effects of caffeine

Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant. In moderate doses, caffeine can:

  • increase alertness
  • reduce fine motor coordination
  • cause insomnia
  • cause headaches, nervousness and dizziness

In massive doses, caffeine is lethal. A fatal dose of caffeine has been calculated to be more than 10 grams (about 170 mg/kg body weight) – this is the same as drinking 80 to 100 cups of coffee in rapid succession – not an easy thing to do.

Caffeine enters the bloodstream through the stomach and small intestine and can have its effects as soon as 15 minutes after it is consumed. Once in the body, caffeine will stay around for hours: it takes about 6 hours for one half of the caffeine to be eliminated.

Caffeine belongs to the xanthine chemical group. Adenosine is a naturally occurring xanthine in the brain that is used as a neurotransmitter at some synapses. One effect of caffeine is to interfere with adenosine at multiple sites in the brain including the reticular formation. Caffeine also acts at other sites in the body to increase heart rate, constrict blood vessels, relax air passages to improve breathing and allow some muscles to contract more easily.

Caffeine increases heartbeat, respiration, basal metabolic rate, gastroenteric reflexes, and the production of stomach acid and urine; and it relaxes smooth muscles, notably the bronchial muscle. All of these changes vary considerably among people and may depend upon the individual’s sensitivity to this drug, his/her metabolism, or upon whether the consumer habitually uses or rarely uses caffeine. How long caffeine’s effects last is influenced by the person’s hormonal status, whether he/she smokes or takes medications, or has a disease that impairs liver functioning.

Caffeine may cause withdrawal symptoms for those who abruptly stop consuming it. These include severe headaches, muscle aches, temporary depression, and irritability.

Caffeine sensitivity refers to the amount of caffeine that will produce an effect in someone. This amount varies from person to person. On average, the smaller the person, the less caffeine necessary to produce side effects. However, caffeine sensitivity is most affected by the amount of daily caffeine use. People who regularly drink beverages containing caffeine soon develop a reduced sensitivity to caffeine. This means they require higher doses of caffeine to achieve the same effects as someone who doesn’t drink caffeinated drinks every day. In short, the more caffeine you take in, the more caffeine you’ll need to feel the same effects.

Caffeine has health risks for certain users. Small children are more sensitive to caffeine because they have not been exposed to it as much as older children or adults. Pregnant women or nursing mothers should consider decreasing their caffeine intake, although in small or moderate amounts there is no evidence that it causes a problem for the baby. Caffeine can aggravate heart problems or nervous disorders, and some teens may not be aware that they’re at risk.

Caffeine Dose

Although the effects of caffeine vary from one person to the next, doctors recommend that people should consume no more than about 100 milligrams (mg) of caffeine daily. That might sound like a lot, but one espresso contains about 100 milligrams of caffeine!

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.

Cutting Back Caffeine

If you’re taking in too much caffeine, you may want to cut back. Kicking the caffeine habit is never easy, and the best way is to cut back slowly. Otherwise you could get headaches and feel achy, depressed, or lousy.

Try cutting your intake by substituting noncaffeinated drinks for caffeinated sodas and coffee. Examples include water, caffeine-free sodas, and caffeine-free teas. Keep track of how many caffeinated drinks you have each day, and substitute one drink per week with a caffeine-free alternative until you’ve gotten below the 100-milligram mark.

As you cut back on the amount of caffeine you consume, you may find yourself feeling tired. Your best bet is to hit the sack, not the sodas: It’s just your body’s way of telling you it needs more rest. Your energy levels will return to normal in a few days.

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Soda is not good for you. The high-calorie, sugary drinks have been linked to obesity and a host of other health problems. Soda can be particularly dangerous to children, who can consume lots of calories quickly through colas and other pop without feeling full. And then there’s the dental toll — it doesn’t take a peer-reviewed study to tell you that drinking lots of sweetened soda isn’t great for your teeth.

But soda isn’t just water, corn syrup and carbonation — a can of Coke or Pepsi also contains chemical additives for coloring and flavoring. And according to one public health group, those additives could increase your chance of getting cancer.

That’s the message from the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a Washington-based consumer watchdog group. CSPI has petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the “caramel coloring” that is used in Coke, Pepsi and other sodas, on the grounds that the chemicals are carcinogenic.

CSPI says the artificial brown coloring — which doesn’t have much to do with actual caramel, despite the name — is made by reacting corn sugar with ammonia and sulfites under high pressures and at high temperatures. (Just like Mom used to do it!) Those reactions produce the chemicals 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole — chemicals that government studies have found to cause lung, liver or thyroid cancer in lab rats or mice. “It’s a small but significant risk, and it’s the kind of thing that government agencies should deal with,” says Michael Jacobson, the executive director of CSPI.

Is Jacobson right? A 2007 study by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found “clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI) in male and
female B6C3F1 mice based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms,” otherwise known as lung tumors. The state of California has also concluded that 4-MEI is a carcinogen, and is in the process of crafting regulations that may require food and drinks containing significant levels of the chemical to bear cancer warnings.

According to California’s regulators, a level of more than 16 micrograms per day would pose a significant risk — meaning it could result in at least one excess case of cancer per 100,000 exposed people. Given that there are roughly 130 micrograms of 4-MI per 12-ounce can of soda — and given that the average American drinks 14 ounces of soda a day, with young men drinking far more — that would mean that most of us would be at some risk.

As a result, CSPI has been petitioning the FDA to change the name or ban the use of the chemicals in soda and other foods, or at least force manufacturers to put warning labels on their packaging. “We think industry can solve this problem,” says Jacobson. “They don’t want to put warning labels on their products.”

The soda industry, however, is fighting back. In a statement the American Beverage Association — an industry group that includes soda makers — denied that 4-MEI posed any danger to human health:

4-MEI is not a threat to human health. There is no evidence that 4-MEI causes cancer in humans. No health regulatory agency around the globe, including the Food and Drug Administration, has said that 4-MEI is a human carcinogen. This petition is nothing more than another attempt to scare consumers by an advocacy group long-dedicated to attacking the food and beverage industry.

In California a number of industry groups — including the American Beverage Association — have filed a lawsuit against state regulators to block efforts to list 4-MEI as a carcinogen:

The state agency’s decision does not reflect sound science and failed to follow its own regulations. Also, it did not take into account all the data available on the subject in this process.

Source: http://healthland.time.com

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Have you ever wondered if a cup of coffee or tea and milk can substitute as one of your recommended eight glasses of water a day?

Most drinks do a good job of hydrating, but the components of some common drinks sharply reduce their hydrating ability.

Which drinks are the best hydrators, and which the worst? Here are the three most hydrating and the four least hydrating drinks.

Drinks That Are Strong Hydrators

Water
Water is the preeminent beverage for correctly hydrating the body.

Herbal Teas (Infusions)
The leaves from plants such as mint, verbena, linden, balm, and so on give a pleasant aroma and flavor to the water in which they are steeped, which makes infusions a satisfying alternative to people who don’t enjoy drinking plain water.

The medicinal properties of the plants do not have a negative effect on the body’s assimilation of the water.

Note: The benefit does not extend to sweetened infusions, or if the tea is made with plants that have diuretic properties, such as dandelion.

Fruit and Vegetable Juices
The water in fruits and vegetables–their juice–is one of the liquids nature has provided for hydrating our bodies. Juice is water bound to a substance. To maintain our harmonic balance with nature and avoid taking in too high a concentration of nutrients and sugars, we should consider juice a secondary resource to be used in moderation.

Drinks that Are Weak Hydrators

Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa
Drinks that have a base of coffee, black tea, or cocoa are quite high in purins, toxins that must be eliminated from the body by urine or sweat in the form of uric acid. Purines need to be diluted in large quantities of liquid to be evacuated without irritation. A good portion of the water consumed with these drinks is used to eliminate the toxins.

Milk
Milk is a food, not a drink, and its digestion by adults is frequently incomplete.

Whey, on the other hand, is very easily digested, but its diuretic properties are an impediment to its consumption as a daily beverage.

Soft Drinks
Soft drinks often have a high caffeine base, a diuretic, which makes a body lose water before it has time to make its way into the intracellular environment. The other problem comes from the high sugar content of most sodas. The body has a hard time properly metabolizing refined sugar. To correct the reaction to this, the body has to surrender water from the extracellular fluid. Because that makes a person thirsty, a vicious circle is created, as the thirst is being maintained by the very beverage that is drink with the intention of getting rid of it.

Alcoholic Beverages
Alcohol itself has dehydrating properties, removing water from the tissues it contacts and drying them out and increasing the need for water.

Adapted from The Water Prescription, by Christopher Vasey, N.D.

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It is possible that adding a large tax on sugary drinks might help the people of the United States to lose weight.

A study that was recently published has determined that it would help American lose weight should the tax was large enough.

However, even then the benefits would primarily be accrued by the middle class and be modest at best.

If the United Stated added a 40% tax to the price of sugary drinks such as sports drinks and sodas that were purchased in a retail store, it would reduce approximately 12 calories from the daily intake of beverages for the average person in the United States. This would translate into a person losing approximately 1 1/4 pounds.

Without doing all of the calculations, it turns out that a 20 % tax wouldn’t work as well as a 40% tax for discouraging the drinking of sugary drinks. Also, should the tax cover more kinds of sugary drinks, the reduction in caloric intake would be somewhat increased which would reduce the options for a substitution of a lower tax.

However, if such a tax could become politically palatable, the benefits from such a tax wouldn’t be advantageous for everybody. The study also determined that increasing the taxes on sugary drinks wouldn’t reduce the weight of the poorest of the wealthiest people in the United States significantly.

The idea of taxing junk food and sugary beverages is gaining some support in some political circles. However, it might be impossible to get public support for such taxes. Recently, a survey was conducted in which people in the United States were ask for their opinion a tax increase directed at sugary drinks.

Over 3,000 people or 51% if the people surveyed either opposed or strongly opposed such tax increases. Only about 1/3 of those surveyed were in favor of a tax increase.

However, there is the deficit to consider and one factor might be how much money the increased taxes might raise. It has been estimated that a tax of 40% on a variety of sugary drinks might gather over $2,500,000,000.

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Over the past 40 years the consumption of soda has increased substantially, much to the pleasure of the soda manufacturers; however, so have the ill effects of its over consumption.

The fact is that today kids consume way too much sugar as compared to 40 years ago. Teenagers are drinking less milk and, as a result, are getting less calcium. They are getting about 40% of their energy/sugar calories from soft drinks.

Currently, teens are drinking half as much milk as soda as compared to 20 years ago. There have been research studies which show that teenage girls who require 1300mg of calcium/day are only getting about 800mg. This lack of calcium can predispose one to broken bones and osteoporosis. Calcium is also important for bone development up to the age of 18.

It is a natural fact that teenage girls who drink too much soda have a much greater risk of breaking a bone or developing osteoporosis. Three cans of soda/day poses a serious risk for teenage boys. Males in the 12 to 29 age range are known to be the single largest group of people who indulge in soda. The risks to one’s health from the over consumption of soda include tooth decay and destruction, osteoporosis, obesity, kidney stones, and diabetes.

Soda contents include caffeine, acid, additive dye, and a high fructose corn syrup. An average can of soda has about 10 to 12 tsp of sugar or 40 to 48 grams of phosphoric or carbonic acid.

The fructose syrup contains zero nutritional value. Caffeine, which is stimulant that is mildly addictive, causes calcium excretion that can result in an increased risk of kidney stones and osteoporosis.

Most people think that the sugar in the soda is bad and that is what causes tooth decay. However, the research shows that the real danger is in the acid. The phosphoric or carbonic acid dissolves the calcium out of the enamel leaving it a softened matrix for bacteria to enter the teeth and cause wholesale tooth destruction. Therefore, sugar free sodas are not a viable answer.

Most individuals who drink a lot of soda range from some minor decalcification of teeth, with white bands of softened enamel which encircle the teeth at or near the gum line to cases where numerous teeth are totally destroyed from decay.

Many of these individuals are students who study while continuously sipping a soda which creates an acid bath for their teeth. Don’t forget the fact that the sugar itself is also converted to acid by the bacteria on the teeth. Coupled all this with poor dental hygiene and you have a recipe for an oral disaster in the making.

The public should be educated regarding the ill effects and the soda companies need to take some responsibility since they insist on glorifying drinking their brands as being a sort of cool. So the next time your kids or you drink a soda, be aware and concerned. Always use moderation. Don’t bathe your teeth in acid, rinse with water and practice good oral hygiene.

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There are many countries in the world, every of which has its own national drink, some even have more than one. Here you will find the most unusual of national drinks.

1. Brazil National Drink
Yerba Mate or hierba mate or erva mate, in Portuguese (Ilex paraguariensis), or sometimes called simply mate, is a species of holly (family Aquifoliaceae) native to subtropical South America in northern Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and southern Brazil and Bolivia. It is used as a herbal tea.

Mate drinking
As with other brewed herbs, yerba mate leaves are dried, chopped, and ground into a powdery mixture. Unlike other brews, however, mate is traditionally sipped from a dried and carefully carved, hollow calabash, through a special metal straw (traditionally silver) called a bombilla. Bombilla usually means “light bulb” in Spanish, but locally it is “little pump” or “straw”.

Preparing the Mate
The method of preparing the mate infusion varies considerably from region to region, and it is hotly debated which method yields the finest outcome. However, nearly all methods have some common elements: the gourd is packed with an abundant amount of yerba, and very hot water (typically from 70–80 degrees Celsius [160–180 degrees Fahrenheit] and never boiling) is added.

2. Nicaragua National Drinks
Here are many national drinks that you will enjoy when you go to Nicaragua.
Some of them are: Fresh tropical fruit juice, Chicha de maíz and de jengibre (in order to make this drink you have to boil corn and then grind it with food coloring), Tiste (this is another unusual drink that you will have the opportunity to taste. It is made from corn and cocoa drink.
Another original drink is cacao. This is actually one of the favorite drinks in the world.

Here goes, a sampling of some of the more unusual national drinks.

3. Sosro Tehbotol National Drink
This is basically sweetened jasmine tea from Indonesia. It has a crisp, clean taste, flowery. It’s an iced tea, but doesn’t need lemon.

4. De Sarro & Torchia BibiCaffe National Drink
This is a carbonated, concentrated coffee. Espresso, caramel, vanilla with bubbles. Not too sweet, a bit of a kick, almost chocolaty. Cute small bottle. One of the best drinks.

5. Almdudler National Drink
Almdudler is the national soft drink of Austria. Tastes like a light lemonade with a sour apple flavor. The bottle design is pretty sharp, with two Almdudler-holics in funky hats looking straight from a Tin-Tin comic.

6. Fentiman’s: Five interesting flavors
Fentimans is a British maker of botanically brewed, slightly fermented beverages. These are microbrewed, hand crafted soda for grownups.

7. China Cola National Drink
A real novelty, this is a cola where the flavor is created by a careful mix of Chinese herbs. Seems like a lot of effort for what’s basically a coke.

8. Sprecher’s Orange Dream National Drink
From Wisconsin, this microbrewed orange soda comes in a hefty bottle with a cow mascot. It’s an orange cream with vanilla and honey.

9. Kombucha Wonder Drink
This Kombucha Wonder Drink is described as “A Sparkling Himalayan Tonic” and a “blend of jasmine tea with essence of Niagara grape”. It’s a kind of sweet and sour, like a musky grape juice. Kombucha is some kind of funky mushroom.

Healthy drinking is a vital part of our health. Learn what drinks are good and healthy
choices, as well as tips for healthy drinking for your health. As you are convincing your family to decrease their sugary drink intake, you can introduce them to these better choices.

If you are healthy drinking soda, you are more likely to have a lower intake of important nutrients, such as vitamin C, vitamin A, folate, magnesium, and calcium. The decrease in calcium can result in reduced bone mass, which can contribute to broken bones in children and can possibly lead to osteoporosis later in life.

Some nutritionists say that healthy drinking high-fructose corn syrup causes weight gain by interfering with the body’s natural ability to suppress hunger feelings. For those who can’t do without their soda pop, natural varieties are growing in popularity and can be found at most health food markets. Many use cane juice to sweeten, because it is less processed but has many of the nutrients found in sugar cane. Others add no sweetener and instead let the real fruit ingredients do the job.

Healthy drinking – water.

Whether it is flat or fizzy, flavored or plain, water is a fundamental component of your family
fitness plan and is the perfect beverage for everyone. Over 1 billion people worldwide have no access to safe drinking water. The United States is fortunate to have one of the best supplies of drinking water in the world. Although tap water that meets federal and state standards is generally safe to drink, threats to drinking water quality in the United States still exist. Outbreaks of drinking water-associated illness and water restrictions during droughts demonstrate that we cannot take our drinking water for granted.

Did you know that your tap drinking water may contain a number of contaminants from a range of sources that can make you ill? Some contaminants have an effect on the look, smell and taste of your drinking water, yet some will be unnoticeable and can potentially have more harmful effects on your health.

Healthy drinking – milk.

Low-fat and fat-free milk are healthful beverage alternatives. Next to water, low-fat or fat-free milk and soy milk are the best beverage options for your family healthy drinking. Milk contains calcium, which we often don’t get enough of, as well as protein. Soy milk is a great alternative to cow’s milk, especially if you are lactose intolerant, have problems with chronic upper respiratory infections (sinus infections or ear infections), have asthma, or are just looking to include more soy in your diet. Chocolate milk is healthy drink for an occasional treat; just try to control the amount of chocolate added to keep the sugar under control.

Healthy drinking – vegetable juice.

Healthy drinking of vegetable juice is a great low-calorie choice that offers antioxidants, such as vitamins A and C, and other nutrients such as lycopene, which has been linked to a reduced risk of prostate cancer. Eight ounces of vegetable juice has 2 grams of fiber, is very low in sugar, and has only 50 calories.

Healthy drinking – coffee drinks.

With the rise of the chain coffee houses has come the popularity of creamy coffee drinks that are chock full of sugar and calories You could easily get more than half of your daily calorie allowance from your coffee break. Fortunately, you don’t have to forgo your treat. There are many lower-calorie choices, such as a small café latte or cappuccino made with fat-free milk (about 120 calories). You could also try for healthy drinking a 12-ounce Chai tea with fat-free milk for about 170 calories. Choose from a selection of herbal teas or, of course, plain old zero-calorie black java. And instead of the muffins or cake, try a crunchy biscotti for around 120 calories.

Healthy drinking – 100 percent fruit juice.

100 percent fruit juice is just that — it is made solely from fruit with no sugar added. Healthy drinking of fruit juice has the added benefit of being full of the vitamins that are naturally found in fruit, such as vitamin C and folate. I would suggest limiting the total amount of juice for the day to 4 to 8 ounces.

Bradford and Airedale Community pharmacy development and clinical governance pharmacist from BAtPCT, Rachel Urban, mark out:

Top tips for babies’ healthy drinking

– Breast milk or infant formula should be the main drink for babies aged one and under

– Cooled boiled water is best if extra drinks are needed between meals
– Sugary drinks should never be served in a bottle
– Parents should not allow babies to use a bottle in bed
– Bottles should not be used by babies aged over 12 months
– Pure unsweetened fruit juice is a useful source of vitamin C and should be drunk with main meals or breakfast
– Squash, if given, should be served at mealtimes only and never in a feeding bottle
– Fizzy drinks – including diet drinks – should be discouraged
– Free-flow feeder cups should be used from six months
– Valve cups, anyway up and sip and seal cups are not recommended

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Sometimes we want something to chew. Not too caloric and not too sweet. Jelly beans candies are most suitable for this purpose.

Jelly beans are a different flavored type of confectionery. Generally they have fruit taste and are made of sugar.

They are small like groundnut. You can easy eat them at work or while moving. Nowadays jelly beans candy producers make also sugar free candies.

What one can drink with confectionery, particularly with jelly beans?

Juice
Kids love candy with juice. But don’t drink it with moderation with candies, if candies contain sugar and juice is acidic it can be not so good for your teeth.

Soda
You probably already know about mints and cola? Therefore be very careful mixing it with different candies. But I think there won’t be any problems with jelly beans. By the way, jelly beans may serve as an alternative to a cola beverage containing 50 gm of glucose, researches say.

Tea
Tea is good with any candies. Better to drink not so hot tea, it can be both black tea or fruit tea.

Coffee
You can try to drink coffee or cappuccino with jelly beans.

Water
Best water quality is that it can wash down absolutely everything, and even more.

What do you drink with jelly beans or after them?

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    Soda – it’s everywhere! Even if you wanted to drink something else, you’d be hard-pressed to find it as prominently displayed in vending machines, at fast-food chains, and supermarket checkouts. You might not realize how ubiquitous Coke, Pepsi, and the like are in our society until you try to stop drinking soda.

    Ever read the ingredients label on that can of soda? Grab one now and read it. Surprising, isn’t it? Most likely the top ingredients are corn syrup or high fructose corn syrup, two very concentrated forms of sweetener, and a whole list of artificial ingredients. Like sugar-free? What does that label say? Anything “natural” in it?

    The supermarket has hundreds of delicious, refreshing alternatives to the nutrient-free soda.

    1. Club soda mixed with pomegranate juice. 160 calories per cup; still bubbly.2. Tonic water with a squeeze of lemon or lime. Only 80 calories; still bubbly.

    3. Light yogurt and fruit smoothie.. Creamy and sweet, high in calcium and only 174 calories per cup.

    4. Tomato juice or V8. Packed with flavor; high in vitamins C, A, and potassium and only 50 calories per cup.

    5. Flavored seltzer. Carbonated, but zero calories.

    6. Energy drink (such as Gatorade). Tastes sweet, 60 calories per cup, contains electrolytes.

    7. Apple cider. Has 120 calories per cup, but packs a tangy, substantial flavor.

    8. Milk, whole or skim. High in calcium and protein–and you need both. With 145 calories per cup of whole milk; 85 calories for skim.

    9. Ovaltine made with skim milk. It’s chocolaty, fortified with vitamins and minerals, high in calcium and protein and 170 calories per cup.

    10. Tea or coffee, unsweetened. Get a boost on less than five calories per cup, plus it’s high in antioxidants.

    Content provided by Revolution Health Group

    A mojito is traditionally made of five ingredients: rum, sugar (traditionally sugar cane juice), lime, carbonated water and mint. Its combination of sweetness and refreshing citrus and mint flavors are intended to mask the potent kick of the rum, and have made this clear cocktail a popular summer drink. Wikipedia

    But what about non-alcoholic drinkers?

    Of course, there can’t be a problem to make any non-alcoholic drink from any cocktail, all the more so non-alcoholic drinks are more cool and refreshing. Let’s discover how to make non-alcoholic mojito!

    To make non-alcoholic mojito (nojito) you need:

    • Fresh mint
    • 1 lime
    • 1 packet sugar substitute
    • Crushed ice
    • 6 fluid ounces lime-flavored sparkling water

    Crush a sprig of mint in the bottom of a cocktail glass. Squeeze the juice of one fresh lime into the glass. Add 1 package of sugar substitute, crushed ice, and 6 ounces of lime-flavored sparkling water. Garnish with mint and serve.

    Or you can try this variation of nojito (mojito) recipe:

    • crushed ice
    • 8 mint leaf
    • 3 ounces lime juice
    • 1 1/2 ounces sugar syrup
    • 2 ounces club soda
    • garnish with mint

    Fill a pint glass 1/3 full with ice, then add mint leaves. Add the lime juice and sugar syrup. Lightly mash the leaves together with the liquid using a muddle stick or wooden pestle, careful not to tear the leaves. Fill the glass with more ice, then add club soda. Garnish with mint, serve, and enjoy!

    Very nice, right?

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    Like the earth, humans and all other animal life are about three-quarters water. It is therefore no wonder that drinking plenty of water is so vital to our well being.

    Many times a day we feel our energy levels falling and we reach for food when, in fact, we are actually in need of water. How often do we spend money and time on medical treatment for conditions which could have easily been prevented through proper hydration.

    Experts say that we are often dehydrated even before we feel thirsty. Water is essential to keep us fit and healthy

    6 Tips on drinking more water:

    1. Add flavored packets If water alone bores you, take advantage of the new flavor packets that are sold specifically to enhance the taste of water.
    2. Get fun to go containers Always have water with you or in the car. Get good size, fun colored containers. The larger the container, the fewer the refills.
    3. Change your daily habits Wake up to your first glass of water.
    4. Make it a rule to order water (with or without lemon) instead of a diet soda when you go out to eat.
    5. Drink a glass before you eat Water helps to curb your appetite. It is easy to confuse hunger with being thirsty, so try water first. Drinking water makes you feel active.
    6. Use straws, add ice and a lemon or even a small slice of orange Make this glass of water feel like a treat.

    So what are we waiting for? Let us drink eight glasses of water a day. It is easy, costs nothing and the benefits are life changing.

    So how much water should one drink each day? The question seems like it commands a simple answer, but the reality is that the response varies based upon your body’s needs. A lot of sources will tell you that you need a minimum of 8 glasses a day, but the truth of the matter is that you need to obey your own internal requirements.

    Experts are now saying that there is no set number. Rather, when you are thirsty, you should drink. If you find yourself experiencing headaches or dizziness, chances are that you are depriving your body of water, whether or not you are meeting the 8 glasses a day standard. If your urine is highly concentrated and anything other than clear/very pale yellow in color, then that is another telltale sign that your body wants more.

    how much glasses of water drinkSo, how much should you drink? – Lots!
    Six to ten glasses is a safe bet but if you want to be more specific it’s recommended you drink 50 – 75% of your body weight in ounces depending on whether you are sedentary or active.

    You might also want to add a bit more if it’s really hot or you are working extra hard, so for example, a person who weighs 150 lbs, lives in a dry climate and is doing strenuous exercises should drink 75% x 150 oz = 112 oz + 15 oz (activity) + 15 oz (climate) = Total 142 oz per day.

    A frequently quoted figure is that adults should drink eight glasses of water a day, although Dr John Leiper, an expert in fluid balance and hydration at Aberdeen University, disputes it. “The figure of eight glasses a day is completely spurious. There is no evidence that drinking that much water does anybody any good. Although it probably won’t be doing you any harm.”

    While it is true that individuals will on average lose about eight glasses worth of water a day, it doesn’t have to be replenished by water: soft drinks, even coffee, all help rehydration. “There is nothing wrong with drinking coffee,” says Dr Leiper. “The idea that coffee is a diuretic is nonsense. Yes, if you give someone who is completely caffeine naive a lot of caffeine, then it will act as a diuretic on them. But if you are used to drinking a lot of coffee then it won’t – your body gets used to it.

    In healthy adults, fluid intake is regulated by thirst. Water is an essential nutrient for life and is considered the ideal drink to quench thirst and ensure hydration.

    Ironically, it is very often ignored as part of our dietary recommendations. Most people are familiar with the general recommendation for adults of eight glasses of water per day. Yet, estimating water or fluid intake requirements is not easy and individual requirements are highly variable.

    The National Research Council (NRC) recommends a daily water intake of approximately 1ml/kcal energy expenditure. The eight glasses of water per day is based on this recommendation and on the average weight of a 70kg male.
    No single formula fits every individual or every situation and water intake recommendations also depend on other factors such as activity, humidity, climate, body temperature and body composition.

    Daily turnover of water is approximately 4% of total body weight and even higher proportions in children.
    Water losses from the lungs and skin (insensible losses; 500 – 1000ml/day) are responsible for approximately half of the daily turnover and sensible losses from stools (50 -100ml/day) and urine account for the rest of the daily losses.
    Yet, despite of changes in body composition and function as well as the environment, most healthy people manage to regulate daily water balance well across their lifespan.

    You can use a very good Hydration Calculator

    Current recommendations:

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) established the Dietary Reference Intakes for water . The committee established the Adequate Intake (AI) for total water to prevent dehydration.
    Based on a wide range of normal hydration status of the population, the AI was established according to the median total fluid intake (water, fluid from food and other drinks). The AI’s for sedentary men and women (aged 19-50 years) is 3,71 and 2,71 litres per day respectively.

    Solid food and digestion of food also contributes to this recommendation. Drinking fluids represents approximately 81% of total water intake, resulting in a recommended intake of 3,01 litres per day for men (12 glasses of 250ml) and 2,71 liters per day (10 glasses of 250ml) for women.

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    Non-Alcoholic Mixed Drinks are often served to children, designated drivers and anyone else who wishes to enjoy a refreshing, (usually) fruity, drink without alcohol.

    Virgin cocktails are usually made in a similar manner as the traditional cocktails, adjusting the proportions of other ingredients as necessary to fill the same volume, while retaining the overall taste and feel of the drink.

    1. Amaretto Stone Sweet Mixed Drink Recipe

    • 2 1/2 oz Blanks® Amaretto (One of a range of non-alcoholic and lower-calorie liqueurs produced by Blanks.)
    • 2 oz Cherry Syrup
    • 4 oz Orange Juice
      Orange juice is one of the most important ingredients (and the most important fruit juice) to have when making cocktails. To get the most juice out of a fresh orange, bring it to room temperature and roll it under your palm against a hard surface before squeezing. Another method is to microwave them on high power for 30 seconds, let stand a couple of minutes before cutting and squeezing them.
    • 4 oz 7-Up® Soda
      Ice

    Blend with ice.

    2. Avocado Milkshake Mixed Drink Recipe

    • 1 liter Milk
    • 2 – 3 Halved and Peeled Avocados
    • 1/2 cup Sugar

    Blend on medium for 3 to 5 minutes. (Use sugar, peeled avocado, condensed milk, and evaporated milk, and ice… works. delicious).

    3. Banana Grape Smoothie Mixed Drink Recipe

    • 2 Large Bananas
    • 2 Handfuls Red, Seedless Grapes
    • 1 cup Ice
      Ice is essential for all types of mixed drinks, and it should always be clean and clear. Usually you would add ice to a glass before pouring any ingredients into it. This cools the liquids and prevents splashes.
    • 1/4 cup Milk

    Place the bananas and grapes into a blender and mix until it is a “smooth” liquid. Add the ice and blend until crushed. Add milk, mix until smooth and pour into a hurricane glass. Serve.

    4. Black Cow Mixed Drink Recipe

    • 2 scoops Vanilla Ice Cream
    • 10 oz Root Beer (A non-alcoholic, carbonated drink, sweetened and flavored with a combination of artificial and natural flavorings).
    • 1 tbsp Chocolate Syrup (A sweet combination of unsweetened cocoa powder, corn syrup and sugar, amongst other flavorings).
    • 1 1/2 oz Whipped Cream (A type of cream containing sugar and emulsifiers. Whipped cream expands on release from pressurized cans).
    • Maraschino Cherries (A sugar syrup coated cherry, dyed red and flavored with almond).

    Pour root beer over ice cream and chocolate syrup in a large tumbler glass. Garnish with whipped cream and a maraschino cherry. Serve with a straw and a long spoon.

    5. Cherry Spritzer Mixed Drink Recipe

    • 2 oz 100% Cherry Juice
    • 4 oz Mineral Water
      Mineral water is water is considered spring water with a larger amount of dissolved mineral salts, that is, at least 250 parts per million of dissolved salts.There is no unpleasant taste in mineral water, and a neutral odor. Although, despite claims to the contrary, there is no proof that mineral water is any better for your health than tap water.

    Pour the cherry juice into the old-fashioned glass filled previously with 3 to 5 ice cubes and add the mineral water. Stir before you serve. You can mix the juice and the mineral water in the fifty-fifty percent relation too, but it is faster energy-delivering and even healthier this way.

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    girls drink carbonated drinksCarbonated soft drinks are the single biggest source of calories in the American diet, providing about 7 percent of calories; adding in noncarbonated drinks brings the figure to 9 percent. Teenagers get 13 percent of their calories from carbonated and noncarbonated soft drinks.

    While many different categories make up the American beverage product picture, carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) paint the broadest strokes. As the “granddaddy of them all,” carbonated soft drinks (CSD)s occupy a unique place in the hearts, minds and palates of the American consumer.

    Still and carbonated soft drinks will also contain trace elements of minerals from their main ingredient, water, and other ingredients e.g. juices. Some are also fortified with vitamins, details of which will appear on the label.

    History of Carbonated Soft Drinks

    Soft drinks have been an anchor in American culture since the beginning of the twentieth century, but the roots of these beverages extend much further back in time.

    The first carbonated soft drinks, which were named as such in order to clearly differentiate them from hard, alcoholic beverages, and the technology to make them were imported from the Europeans, who had discovered how to force carbon dioxide gas into water back in the sixteenth century.

    The original bubbly drinks were carbonated mineral waters mimicking those found in therapeutic natural springs and the first of these were patented in the United States in 1810. Less than a decade later, the soda fountain was patented as well. By the mid-1800s, American chemists and pharmacists were concocting sweetened, flavored carbonated beverages.

    Soft drinks now can be found most anywhere in the world, but nowhere are they as ubiquitous as in the United States, where 450 different types are sold and more than 2.5 million vending machines dispense them around the clock, including in our schools. The American Beverage Association says that, in 2004, 28 percent of all beverages consumed in the U.S. were carbonated soft drinks.

    Why are Carbonated Soft Drinks a Concern for Health?

    Excessive use of carbonated beverages, sports drinks and fruit drinks can impact bone health, oral health and lead to obesity in young people. The typical 12-ounce can of non-diet pop provides approximately 150 calories, nine teaspoons of sugar, and no minerals or vitamins.
    Sports drinks and fruit drinks have similar amounts of sugar and calories but often have
    some vitamins and minerals.

    Because many carbonated soft drinks are high in caffeine, they are also mildly addictive, leading to increased consumption. Girls ages 12 to 19 years consume an average of 59 mg of caffeine per day and boys consume an average of 86 mg of caffeine per day. One can of cola contains 40 to 45 mg of caffeine.

    The high acid and sugar content of pop provide a rich environment for dental decay. The high calorie content of pop may add to the increasing rate of obesity in youth. Overweight adolescents are more likely to become overweight adults.

    As carbonated soft drinks tend to contain high amounts of both sugars and acids, they’re the worst possible combination for dental health.

    A new study on the risk factors associated with nighttime heartburn found drinking carbonated soft drinks and the use of benzodiazepines, a commonly-prescribed class of sleeping pill, are among the strongest predictors of that painful burning sensation.

    School-age girls who drink a lot of carbonated soft drinks are increasing their risk of osteoporosis.

    Carbonated Soft drinks and bones health men crush a can with carbonated drink

    There has been a theory that the phosphoric acid contained in some soft drinks (colas) displaces calcium from the bones, lowering bone density of the skeleton and leading to conditions such as osteoporosis and very weak bones. However, calcium metabolism studies by leading calcium and bone expert Dr. Robert Heaney determined that the net effect of carbonated soft drinks, (including colas, which use phosphoric acid as the acidulant) on calcium retention was negligible. He concluded that it is likely that colas prominence in observational studies is due to their prominence in the marketplace, and that the real issue is that people who drink a lot of soft drinks also tend to have an overall diet that is low in calcium.

    Reducing consumption of carbonated soft drinks, replacing benzodiazepines with other types of sleeping pills, and losing weight can all help reduce nighttime heartburn.

    3 2586

    How Much Liters of Water People Should Drink a Day? Why? a man drinks fresh water

    A person’s body loses, during an average day in a temperate climate approximately 2.5 litres of water. This can be through the lungs as water vapor, through the skin as sweat, or through the kidneys as urine. Some water is also lost through the bowels.

    In warm or humid weather or during heavy exertion, however, the water loss can increase by an order of magnitude or more through perspiration — all of which must be promptly replaced. In extreme cases, the losses may be great enough to exceed the body’s ability to absorb water from the gastrointestinal tract; in these cases, it is not possible to drink enough water to stay hydrated, and the only way to avoid dehydration is to reduce perspiration.

    Why We Should Drink Water?

    Since our bodies are mostly water, we need to keep in good water balance to avoid getting dehydrated. Drinking water can help us stay in good fluid balance. Another bonus is that water has no calories.

    It’s known that soda drinks are very dehydrating. Similar is being said about coffee and tea, due to Caffeine’s diuretic qualities (it makes you urinate more frequently), but there is a lot of controversy about this subject. Most likely is consumed in moderate dozes it shouldn’t be a problem.

    When doing intensive sports, one hears a lot about hypotonic and isotonic drinks, which are designed to quickly replace fluids lost through sweating. There are also the hypertonic drinks, which are solutions with a higher carbohydrate electrolyte concentration than body fluids and those aren’t good for hydration.

    Drinking water is extremely important, especially on hot days. However, even on cold days, you lose fluids while breathing cold air, so fluids are still important. For that reason, make sure to drink before, during and after your activity. Drinking water is perhaps the easiest way to minimize unnecessary joint and muscle pain, and can reduce fatigue. Water is an excellent choice, but 100% pure fruit juices (not fruit ‘drinks’ or fruit punch-type beverages), milk and vegetable juices are also good. Special “sports drinks” are not necessary for light to moderate activity, however they might be beneficial during vigorous activity lasting longer than 1 hour.

    Here are 10 Powerful Reasons to Drink Water (with tips on how to form the water habit afterwards):

    1. Heart Healthy. Drinking a good amount of water could lower your risks of a heart attack.
    2. Energy. Being dehydrated can sap your energy and make you feel tired — even mild dehydration of as little as 1 or 2 percent of your body weight. If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated — and this can lead to fatigue, muscle weakness, dizziness and other symptoms.
    3. Cleansing. Water is used by the body to help flush out toxins and waste products from the body.
    4. Headache Cure. Another symptom of dehydration is headaches. In fact, often when we have headaches it’s simply a matter of not drinking enough water. There are lots of other causes of headaches of course, but dehydration is a common one.
    5. Weight Loss. Water is one of the best tools for weight loss, first of all because it often replaces high-calorie drinks like soda and juice and alcohol with a drink that doesn’t have any calories. But it’s also a great appetite suppressant, and often when we think we’re hungry, we’re actually just thirsty. Water has no fat, no calories, no carbs, no sugar.
    6. Healthy Skin. Drinking water can clear up your skin and people often report a healthy glow after drinking water. It won’t happen overnight, of course, but just a week of drinking a healthy amount of water can have good effects on your skin.
    7. Digestive Problems. Our digestive systems need a good amount of water to digest food properly. Often water can help cure stomach acid problems, and water along with fiber can cure constipation (often a result of dehydration).
    8. Good Mood. Your body fells very good that’s why you soul feels happy.
    9. Cancer Risk. Related to the digestive system item above, drinking a healthy amount of water has also been found to reduce the risk of colon cancer by 45%. Drinking lots of water can also reduce the risk of bladder cancer by 50% and potentially reduce the risk of breast cancer.
    10. Better Exercise. Being dehydrated can severely hamper your athletic activities, slowing you down and making it harder to lift weights. Exercise requires additional water, so be sure to hydrate before, during and after exercise.

    The Amount of Water We Drink per Day

    The amount of water we drink depends on what on what we do each day.

    If we are at work, and we are at the office all day then we’ll drink between 1 to 2 litres of water between 8.30am and 5.00pm

    If we are having a factory trial or we are at the factory playing with machinery, then it’s anything between 2-4 litres because its always very hot down there.

    If we go out for drinks with friends/work colleagues, then we match a glass of water/soft drink for every glass/shot of alcohol we have, or at least we try to remember to do it.

    If we are out doing sports, we’ll consume an extra 2 litres of our sports drink (just gatorate powder in water) before we’ve finished a training session for out-rigging/dragon boat or football, or just 1 litre of water if it’s just the gym.

    We don’t really aim to drink a specified amount of water per day. We just drink what we need for our body to feel comfortable.

    Level of Water for Adults

    For healthy sedentary adults living in temperate climates:

    Men: 125 oz (3.7 liters) of water per day from all dietary sources
    Women: 91 oz (2.7 liters) of water per day from all dietary sources

    For most people, this amount of water per day is a lot more than they normally drink. The requirement for men is roughly 1 gallon per day. How many of you men out there drink this much water every single day? For the women, 91 ounces is roughly 3 quarts.

    However, an exercising athlete can lose enormous quantities of body water through perspiration. The recommendations listed above don’t apply to endurance athletes.

    How Much You Need to Drink Water rose in the glass of water

    The optimum amount of water you should drink depends on your body weight. The fatter you are, the more you need to drink.

    Take one-half of the amount of your weight in pounds and convert that to ounces and that is how many ounces you should be drinking. Thus, if you weigh 128 pounds, you should be drinking 64 ounces a day. If you weigh 300 pounds, you need to drink 150 ounces a day. You can’t just categorize any liquid consumption as being adequate to meet the recommended amount– for example, coffee is a diuretic and causes you to lose water, so you wouldn’t want to try meeting your daily water requirements with large quantities of that.

    2 5886

    “Real programmers drink too much coffee so that they will
    always seem tense and overworked”.

    Most Popular Programmer's DrinksProgramming at a high level on a day to day basis requires grit, determination, and stimulants. To satisfy the third requirement, some programmers go with coffee, others prefer caffeinated beverages, and a few might try not-so-kosher stimulants.

    Perhaps the most universally recognized tool for improving a professional programmer’s productivity is C. Not the C language, but the C additive, Caffeine.

    We would begin with a definition:
    Caffeine: a bitter alkaloid C8H10N4O2 found esp. in coffee, tea, and kola nuts and other healthy drinks and used medicinally as a stimulant and diuretic.

    Pepsi Drink

    Pepsi may be the choice of a new generation, but definitely *not* a new generation of programmers. Finishing dead last in performance and buried in the middle of the pack with respect to calories, Pepsi is a generally uninspired product. The user interface (taste) is distinctive, but its caffeine engine lacks the punch of the other products we surveyed.

    Jolt Cola Drink

    Jolt is playing its role as spoiler to the hilt. In the face of a huge tide of “caffeine-free” soft drinks, Jolt boasts that it has “all the sugar and twice the caffeine.” On the surface, at least, it seems as if the programmer’s ship has come in. Jolt’s user interface is good, containing the bite and “look and feel” of Classic Coke and winning the scouring test.

    The classic caffeine-laden cola. Jolt is the favored drink of computer programmers everywhere. Double the caffeine of Coke in a variety of new flavors. Contrary to popular belief, Jolt doesn’t have any more sugar than regular soft drinks. Their new cans are resealable, to help keep the fizz in.(72mg in 12oz)

    It is known that all real programmers drink only coke and eat only pizza – at least after more than 28 hours in front of a computer screen some people think. But only the greatest programmers drink cappuccino’s. Some of the computer programmers drink mint tea with pine nuts. Programmers drink loads of soda.

    Cappuccino Drink

    Cappuccino is an Italian, coffee-based drink prepared with espresso, hot milk, and milk foam. A cappuccino differs from a caffè latte—which is also from the Italian coffee menu—in that a latte is prepared with espresso and twice (or more) the amount of milk as a cappuccino and little or no milk foam. A cappuccino is traditionally served in a porcelain cup, which has far better heat retention characteristics than glass or paper. The foam on top of the cappuccino acts as an insulator and helps retain the heat of the liquid, allowing it to stay hotter longer. Cappuccino is the tasty and useful healthy drink which helps computer programmers not to sleep.

    Coffee Drink

    In line with the view that coffee is the most common drink for people to spill on their computers, it was also the most common drink for programmers.

    It’s just so stereotypical to think of computer programmers drinking coffee all day, working late into the night. Caffeine is a stimulant, it reduces drowsiness and restores alertness, it also increases the capacity for mental and physical labor.

    French is a popular coffee among programmers because doesn’t need a lot of care; like commercial software. Its exciting taste has inspired thousands of programmers in writing incredible software, written in the very first ours of a day. Windows for example was written at 5:00 o’clock in the morning, Due to coffee! A result is guaranteed.

    It’s said that programmers need coffee to function.

    Mountain Dew

    Mountain Dew is an essential ingredient for successful computer programming. Mountain Dew is so popular with computer programmers and gamers or anyone else who doesn’t want to sleep.

    The Code Red worm was named for the fact that anti-virus software programmers drank Mountain Dew “Code Red” to stay awake while working on the software update that would protect against this threat.

    However, some studies have linked drinking soft drinks with risk factors for heart disease, but this study suggests that diet soft drinks sweetened with artificial sweeteners are just as likely to be linked as high calorie drinks sweetened with sugar.

    Water

    Water – the most useful drink for programmers. Not only is it good for you and will keep your mind off soda/coffee/alcohol…but you’ll start going to the bathroom more often and you’ll burn off a couple of calories walking there!

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