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Soft Drinks

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Around 90 percent of Americans consume caffeine in one form or another every single day. More than half of all American adults consume more than 300 milligrams (mg) of caffeine every day, making it America’s most popular drug by far. The caffeine comes in from things like coffee, tea, cola, chocolate, etc.

Have you ever wondered what it is that makes caffeine so popular? What does this drug do that causes its use to be so widespread? In this article, you will learn all about caffeine.

What Is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a drug that is naturally produced in the leaves and seeds of many plants. It’s also produced artificially and added to certain foods. It’s part of the same group of drugs sometimes used to treat asthma.

Caffeine is defined as a drug because it stimulates the central nervous system, causing increased heart rate and alertness. Most people who are sensitive to caffeine experience a temporary increase in energy and elevation in mood.

Caffeine is an addictive drug. Among its many actions, it operates using the same mechanisms that amphetamines, cocaine, and heroin use to stimulate the brain. On a spectrum, caffeine’s effects are more mild than amphetamines, cocaine and heroin, but it is manipulating the same channels, and that is one of the things that gives caffeine its addictive qualities. If you feel like you cannot function without it and must consume it every day, then you are addicted to caffeine.

Products containing caffeine

Caffeine is in tea leaves, coffee beans, chocolate, many soft drinks, pain relievers, and other over-the-counter pills. In its natural form, caffeine tastes very bitter. But most caffeinated drinks have gone through enough processing to camouflage the bitter taste. Most teens get the majority of their caffeine intake through soft drinks, which can also have added sugar and artificial flavors.

Effects of caffeine

Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant. In moderate doses, caffeine can:

  • increase alertness
  • reduce fine motor coordination
  • cause insomnia
  • cause headaches, nervousness and dizziness

In massive doses, caffeine is lethal. A fatal dose of caffeine has been calculated to be more than 10 grams (about 170 mg/kg body weight) – this is the same as drinking 80 to 100 cups of coffee in rapid succession – not an easy thing to do.

Caffeine enters the bloodstream through the stomach and small intestine and can have its effects as soon as 15 minutes after it is consumed. Once in the body, caffeine will stay around for hours: it takes about 6 hours for one half of the caffeine to be eliminated.

Caffeine belongs to the xanthine chemical group. Adenosine is a naturally occurring xanthine in the brain that is used as a neurotransmitter at some synapses. One effect of caffeine is to interfere with adenosine at multiple sites in the brain including the reticular formation. Caffeine also acts at other sites in the body to increase heart rate, constrict blood vessels, relax air passages to improve breathing and allow some muscles to contract more easily.

Caffeine increases heartbeat, respiration, basal metabolic rate, gastroenteric reflexes, and the production of stomach acid and urine; and it relaxes smooth muscles, notably the bronchial muscle. All of these changes vary considerably among people and may depend upon the individual’s sensitivity to this drug, his/her metabolism, or upon whether the consumer habitually uses or rarely uses caffeine. How long caffeine’s effects last is influenced by the person’s hormonal status, whether he/she smokes or takes medications, or has a disease that impairs liver functioning.

Caffeine may cause withdrawal symptoms for those who abruptly stop consuming it. These include severe headaches, muscle aches, temporary depression, and irritability.

Caffeine sensitivity refers to the amount of caffeine that will produce an effect in someone. This amount varies from person to person. On average, the smaller the person, the less caffeine necessary to produce side effects. However, caffeine sensitivity is most affected by the amount of daily caffeine use. People who regularly drink beverages containing caffeine soon develop a reduced sensitivity to caffeine. This means they require higher doses of caffeine to achieve the same effects as someone who doesn’t drink caffeinated drinks every day. In short, the more caffeine you take in, the more caffeine you’ll need to feel the same effects.

Caffeine has health risks for certain users. Small children are more sensitive to caffeine because they have not been exposed to it as much as older children or adults. Pregnant women or nursing mothers should consider decreasing their caffeine intake, although in small or moderate amounts there is no evidence that it causes a problem for the baby. Caffeine can aggravate heart problems or nervous disorders, and some teens may not be aware that they’re at risk.

Caffeine Dose

Although the effects of caffeine vary from one person to the next, doctors recommend that people should consume no more than about 100 milligrams (mg) of caffeine daily. That might sound like a lot, but one espresso contains about 100 milligrams of caffeine!

For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a day is not harmful. However, too much caffeine can make you restless, anxious and irritable. It may also keep you from sleeping well and cause headaches, abnormal heart rhythms or other problems. If you stop using caffeine, you could get withdrawal symptoms.

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others. They should limit their use of caffeine. So should pregnant and nursing women. Certain drugs and supplements may interact with caffeine. If you have questions about whether caffeine is safe for you, talk with your health care provider.

Cutting Back Caffeine

If you’re taking in too much caffeine, you may want to cut back. Kicking the caffeine habit is never easy, and the best way is to cut back slowly. Otherwise you could get headaches and feel achy, depressed, or lousy.

Try cutting your intake by substituting noncaffeinated drinks for caffeinated sodas and coffee. Examples include water, caffeine-free sodas, and caffeine-free teas. Keep track of how many caffeinated drinks you have each day, and substitute one drink per week with a caffeine-free alternative until you’ve gotten below the 100-milligram mark.

As you cut back on the amount of caffeine you consume, you may find yourself feeling tired. Your best bet is to hit the sack, not the sodas: It’s just your body’s way of telling you it needs more rest. Your energy levels will return to normal in a few days.

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According to Peter Piper, professor from Sheffield University, carbonated drinks contain a substance which harmful effects are still being underestimated.

Many of the problems that are associated with age-related changes or alcohol abuse, such as cirrhosis of the liver and Parkinson’s disease can be caused by usual soft drinks.

After spending a huge amount of time on experiments in his laboratory, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, P. Piper came to the conclusion that sodium benzoate (E211), a widespread preservative in food industry being accepted by relevant authorities in different countries, can be very dangerous for your health.

Sodium benzoate has already been the subject of concern, but at that time it dealt with its carcinogenic effect.

The fact is that in conjunction with vitamin C in soft drinks, sodium benzoate produces benzene – a carcinogenic substance. There are even cases of withdrawing of some brands of drinks from the sale due to increased benzene content.

However, in general E211 is considered a safe additive, of course, with respect to current regulations at its maximum content in products.

Peter Piper has checked the effect of sodium benzoate on living yeast cells and found that this agent affects an important area of DNA in the mitochondria. He reported that these chemicals cause severe damage to DNA in the mitochondria and completely inactivate it.

Mitochondria give you energy and if you hurt them in large quantities, the cells start to malfunction. There are many diseases that are associated specifically with defect of this part of DNA: Parkinson’s disease and several neurodegenerative diseases; and yet it is associated with aging.

As a result of his experiments, the scientist proposes to revise standards of levels of E211 in food.

He believes that the existing methods for determining the damage from sodium benzoate are not quite true. Piper is particularly concerned of children who consume carbonated drinks in large quantities.

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Have you ever wondered if a cup of coffee or tea and milk can substitute as one of your recommended eight glasses of water a day?

Most drinks do a good job of hydrating, but the components of some common drinks sharply reduce their hydrating ability.

Which drinks are the best hydrators, and which the worst? Here are the three most hydrating and the four least hydrating drinks.

Drinks That Are Strong Hydrators

Water
Water is the preeminent beverage for correctly hydrating the body.

Herbal Teas (Infusions)
The leaves from plants such as mint, verbena, linden, balm, and so on give a pleasant aroma and flavor to the water in which they are steeped, which makes infusions a satisfying alternative to people who don’t enjoy drinking plain water.

The medicinal properties of the plants do not have a negative effect on the body’s assimilation of the water.

Note: The benefit does not extend to sweetened infusions, or if the tea is made with plants that have diuretic properties, such as dandelion.

Fruit and Vegetable Juices
The water in fruits and vegetables–their juice–is one of the liquids nature has provided for hydrating our bodies. Juice is water bound to a substance. To maintain our harmonic balance with nature and avoid taking in too high a concentration of nutrients and sugars, we should consider juice a secondary resource to be used in moderation.

Drinks that Are Weak Hydrators

Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa
Drinks that have a base of coffee, black tea, or cocoa are quite high in purins, toxins that must be eliminated from the body by urine or sweat in the form of uric acid. Purines need to be diluted in large quantities of liquid to be evacuated without irritation. A good portion of the water consumed with these drinks is used to eliminate the toxins.

Milk
Milk is a food, not a drink, and its digestion by adults is frequently incomplete.

Whey, on the other hand, is very easily digested, but its diuretic properties are an impediment to its consumption as a daily beverage.

Soft Drinks
Soft drinks often have a high caffeine base, a diuretic, which makes a body lose water before it has time to make its way into the intracellular environment. The other problem comes from the high sugar content of most sodas. The body has a hard time properly metabolizing refined sugar. To correct the reaction to this, the body has to surrender water from the extracellular fluid. Because that makes a person thirsty, a vicious circle is created, as the thirst is being maintained by the very beverage that is drink with the intention of getting rid of it.

Alcoholic Beverages
Alcohol itself has dehydrating properties, removing water from the tissues it contacts and drying them out and increasing the need for water.

Adapted from The Water Prescription, by Christopher Vasey, N.D.

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Over the past 40 years the consumption of soda has increased substantially, much to the pleasure of the soda manufacturers; however, so have the ill effects of its over consumption.

The fact is that today kids consume way too much sugar as compared to 40 years ago. Teenagers are drinking less milk and, as a result, are getting less calcium. They are getting about 40% of their energy/sugar calories from soft drinks.

Currently, teens are drinking half as much milk as soda as compared to 20 years ago. There have been research studies which show that teenage girls who require 1300mg of calcium/day are only getting about 800mg. This lack of calcium can predispose one to broken bones and osteoporosis. Calcium is also important for bone development up to the age of 18.

It is a natural fact that teenage girls who drink too much soda have a much greater risk of breaking a bone or developing osteoporosis. Three cans of soda/day poses a serious risk for teenage boys. Males in the 12 to 29 age range are known to be the single largest group of people who indulge in soda. The risks to one’s health from the over consumption of soda include tooth decay and destruction, osteoporosis, obesity, kidney stones, and diabetes.

Soda contents include caffeine, acid, additive dye, and a high fructose corn syrup. An average can of soda has about 10 to 12 tsp of sugar or 40 to 48 grams of phosphoric or carbonic acid.

The fructose syrup contains zero nutritional value. Caffeine, which is stimulant that is mildly addictive, causes calcium excretion that can result in an increased risk of kidney stones and osteoporosis.

Most people think that the sugar in the soda is bad and that is what causes tooth decay. However, the research shows that the real danger is in the acid. The phosphoric or carbonic acid dissolves the calcium out of the enamel leaving it a softened matrix for bacteria to enter the teeth and cause wholesale tooth destruction. Therefore, sugar free sodas are not a viable answer.

Most individuals who drink a lot of soda range from some minor decalcification of teeth, with white bands of softened enamel which encircle the teeth at or near the gum line to cases where numerous teeth are totally destroyed from decay.

Many of these individuals are students who study while continuously sipping a soda which creates an acid bath for their teeth. Don’t forget the fact that the sugar itself is also converted to acid by the bacteria on the teeth. Coupled all this with poor dental hygiene and you have a recipe for an oral disaster in the making.

The public should be educated regarding the ill effects and the soda companies need to take some responsibility since they insist on glorifying drinking their brands as being a sort of cool. So the next time your kids or you drink a soda, be aware and concerned. Always use moderation. Don’t bathe your teeth in acid, rinse with water and practice good oral hygiene.

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Like the earth, humans and all other animal life are about three-quarters water. It is therefore no wonder that drinking plenty of water is so vital to our well being.

Many times a day we feel our energy levels falling and we reach for food when, in fact, we are actually in need of water. How often do we spend money and time on medical treatment for conditions which could have easily been prevented through proper hydration.

Experts say that we are often dehydrated even before we feel thirsty. Water is essential to keep us fit and healthy

6 Tips on drinking more water:

  1. Add flavored packets If water alone bores you, take advantage of the new flavor packets that are sold specifically to enhance the taste of water.
  2. Get fun to go containers Always have water with you or in the car. Get good size, fun colored containers. The larger the container, the fewer the refills.
  3. Change your daily habits Wake up to your first glass of water.
  4. Make it a rule to order water (with or without lemon) instead of a diet soda when you go out to eat.
  5. Drink a glass before you eat Water helps to curb your appetite. It is easy to confuse hunger with being thirsty, so try water first. Drinking water makes you feel active.
  6. Use straws, add ice and a lemon or even a small slice of orange Make this glass of water feel like a treat.

So what are we waiting for? Let us drink eight glasses of water a day. It is easy, costs nothing and the benefits are life changing.

So how much water should one drink each day? The question seems like it commands a simple answer, but the reality is that the response varies based upon your body’s needs. A lot of sources will tell you that you need a minimum of 8 glasses a day, but the truth of the matter is that you need to obey your own internal requirements.

Experts are now saying that there is no set number. Rather, when you are thirsty, you should drink. If you find yourself experiencing headaches or dizziness, chances are that you are depriving your body of water, whether or not you are meeting the 8 glasses a day standard. If your urine is highly concentrated and anything other than clear/very pale yellow in color, then that is another telltale sign that your body wants more.

how much glasses of water drinkSo, how much should you drink? – Lots!
Six to ten glasses is a safe bet but if you want to be more specific it’s recommended you drink 50 – 75% of your body weight in ounces depending on whether you are sedentary or active.

You might also want to add a bit more if it’s really hot or you are working extra hard, so for example, a person who weighs 150 lbs, lives in a dry climate and is doing strenuous exercises should drink 75% x 150 oz = 112 oz + 15 oz (activity) + 15 oz (climate) = Total 142 oz per day.

A frequently quoted figure is that adults should drink eight glasses of water a day, although Dr John Leiper, an expert in fluid balance and hydration at Aberdeen University, disputes it. “The figure of eight glasses a day is completely spurious. There is no evidence that drinking that much water does anybody any good. Although it probably won’t be doing you any harm.”

While it is true that individuals will on average lose about eight glasses worth of water a day, it doesn’t have to be replenished by water: soft drinks, even coffee, all help rehydration. “There is nothing wrong with drinking coffee,” says Dr Leiper. “The idea that coffee is a diuretic is nonsense. Yes, if you give someone who is completely caffeine naive a lot of caffeine, then it will act as a diuretic on them. But if you are used to drinking a lot of coffee then it won’t – your body gets used to it.

In healthy adults, fluid intake is regulated by thirst. Water is an essential nutrient for life and is considered the ideal drink to quench thirst and ensure hydration.

Ironically, it is very often ignored as part of our dietary recommendations. Most people are familiar with the general recommendation for adults of eight glasses of water per day. Yet, estimating water or fluid intake requirements is not easy and individual requirements are highly variable.

The National Research Council (NRC) recommends a daily water intake of approximately 1ml/kcal energy expenditure. The eight glasses of water per day is based on this recommendation and on the average weight of a 70kg male.
No single formula fits every individual or every situation and water intake recommendations also depend on other factors such as activity, humidity, climate, body temperature and body composition.

Daily turnover of water is approximately 4% of total body weight and even higher proportions in children.
Water losses from the lungs and skin (insensible losses; 500 – 1000ml/day) are responsible for approximately half of the daily turnover and sensible losses from stools (50 -100ml/day) and urine account for the rest of the daily losses.
Yet, despite of changes in body composition and function as well as the environment, most healthy people manage to regulate daily water balance well across their lifespan.

You can use a very good Hydration Calculator

Current recommendations:

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) established the Dietary Reference Intakes for water . The committee established the Adequate Intake (AI) for total water to prevent dehydration.
Based on a wide range of normal hydration status of the population, the AI was established according to the median total fluid intake (water, fluid from food and other drinks). The AI’s for sedentary men and women (aged 19-50 years) is 3,71 and 2,71 litres per day respectively.

Solid food and digestion of food also contributes to this recommendation. Drinking fluids represents approximately 81% of total water intake, resulting in a recommended intake of 3,01 litres per day for men (12 glasses of 250ml) and 2,71 liters per day (10 glasses of 250ml) for women.

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girls drink carbonated drinksCarbonated soft drinks are the single biggest source of calories in the American diet, providing about 7 percent of calories; adding in noncarbonated drinks brings the figure to 9 percent. Teenagers get 13 percent of their calories from carbonated and noncarbonated soft drinks.

While many different categories make up the American beverage product picture, carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) paint the broadest strokes. As the “granddaddy of them all,” carbonated soft drinks (CSD)s occupy a unique place in the hearts, minds and palates of the American consumer.

Still and carbonated soft drinks will also contain trace elements of minerals from their main ingredient, water, and other ingredients e.g. juices. Some are also fortified with vitamins, details of which will appear on the label.

History of Carbonated Soft Drinks

Soft drinks have been an anchor in American culture since the beginning of the twentieth century, but the roots of these beverages extend much further back in time.

The first carbonated soft drinks, which were named as such in order to clearly differentiate them from hard, alcoholic beverages, and the technology to make them were imported from the Europeans, who had discovered how to force carbon dioxide gas into water back in the sixteenth century.

The original bubbly drinks were carbonated mineral waters mimicking those found in therapeutic natural springs and the first of these were patented in the United States in 1810. Less than a decade later, the soda fountain was patented as well. By the mid-1800s, American chemists and pharmacists were concocting sweetened, flavored carbonated beverages.

Soft drinks now can be found most anywhere in the world, but nowhere are they as ubiquitous as in the United States, where 450 different types are sold and more than 2.5 million vending machines dispense them around the clock, including in our schools. The American Beverage Association says that, in 2004, 28 percent of all beverages consumed in the U.S. were carbonated soft drinks.

Why are Carbonated Soft Drinks a Concern for Health?

Excessive use of carbonated beverages, sports drinks and fruit drinks can impact bone health, oral health and lead to obesity in young people. The typical 12-ounce can of non-diet pop provides approximately 150 calories, nine teaspoons of sugar, and no minerals or vitamins.
Sports drinks and fruit drinks have similar amounts of sugar and calories but often have
some vitamins and minerals.

Because many carbonated soft drinks are high in caffeine, they are also mildly addictive, leading to increased consumption. Girls ages 12 to 19 years consume an average of 59 mg of caffeine per day and boys consume an average of 86 mg of caffeine per day. One can of cola contains 40 to 45 mg of caffeine.

The high acid and sugar content of pop provide a rich environment for dental decay. The high calorie content of pop may add to the increasing rate of obesity in youth. Overweight adolescents are more likely to become overweight adults.

As carbonated soft drinks tend to contain high amounts of both sugars and acids, they’re the worst possible combination for dental health.

A new study on the risk factors associated with nighttime heartburn found drinking carbonated soft drinks and the use of benzodiazepines, a commonly-prescribed class of sleeping pill, are among the strongest predictors of that painful burning sensation.

School-age girls who drink a lot of carbonated soft drinks are increasing their risk of osteoporosis.

Carbonated Soft drinks and bones health men crush a can with carbonated drink

There has been a theory that the phosphoric acid contained in some soft drinks (colas) displaces calcium from the bones, lowering bone density of the skeleton and leading to conditions such as osteoporosis and very weak bones. However, calcium metabolism studies by leading calcium and bone expert Dr. Robert Heaney determined that the net effect of carbonated soft drinks, (including colas, which use phosphoric acid as the acidulant) on calcium retention was negligible. He concluded that it is likely that colas prominence in observational studies is due to their prominence in the marketplace, and that the real issue is that people who drink a lot of soft drinks also tend to have an overall diet that is low in calcium.

Reducing consumption of carbonated soft drinks, replacing benzodiazepines with other types of sleeping pills, and losing weight can all help reduce nighttime heartburn.

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“Real programmers drink too much coffee so that they will
always seem tense and overworked”.

Most Popular Programmer's DrinksProgramming at a high level on a day to day basis requires grit, determination, and stimulants. To satisfy the third requirement, some programmers go with coffee, others prefer caffeinated beverages, and a few might try not-so-kosher stimulants.

Perhaps the most universally recognized tool for improving a professional programmer’s productivity is C. Not the C language, but the C additive, Caffeine.

We would begin with a definition:
Caffeine: a bitter alkaloid C8H10N4O2 found esp. in coffee, tea, and kola nuts and other healthy drinks and used medicinally as a stimulant and diuretic.

Pepsi Drink

Pepsi may be the choice of a new generation, but definitely *not* a new generation of programmers. Finishing dead last in performance and buried in the middle of the pack with respect to calories, Pepsi is a generally uninspired product. The user interface (taste) is distinctive, but its caffeine engine lacks the punch of the other products we surveyed.

Jolt Cola Drink

Jolt is playing its role as spoiler to the hilt. In the face of a huge tide of “caffeine-free” soft drinks, Jolt boasts that it has “all the sugar and twice the caffeine.” On the surface, at least, it seems as if the programmer’s ship has come in. Jolt’s user interface is good, containing the bite and “look and feel” of Classic Coke and winning the scouring test.

The classic caffeine-laden cola. Jolt is the favored drink of computer programmers everywhere. Double the caffeine of Coke in a variety of new flavors. Contrary to popular belief, Jolt doesn’t have any more sugar than regular soft drinks. Their new cans are resealable, to help keep the fizz in.(72mg in 12oz)

It is known that all real programmers drink only coke and eat only pizza – at least after more than 28 hours in front of a computer screen some people think. But only the greatest programmers drink cappuccino’s. Some of the computer programmers drink mint tea with pine nuts. Programmers drink loads of soda.

Cappuccino Drink

Cappuccino is an Italian, coffee-based drink prepared with espresso, hot milk, and milk foam. A cappuccino differs from a caffè latte—which is also from the Italian coffee menu—in that a latte is prepared with espresso and twice (or more) the amount of milk as a cappuccino and little or no milk foam. A cappuccino is traditionally served in a porcelain cup, which has far better heat retention characteristics than glass or paper. The foam on top of the cappuccino acts as an insulator and helps retain the heat of the liquid, allowing it to stay hotter longer. Cappuccino is the tasty and useful healthy drink which helps computer programmers not to sleep.

Coffee Drink

In line with the view that coffee is the most common drink for people to spill on their computers, it was also the most common drink for programmers.

It’s just so stereotypical to think of computer programmers drinking coffee all day, working late into the night. Caffeine is a stimulant, it reduces drowsiness and restores alertness, it also increases the capacity for mental and physical labor.

French is a popular coffee among programmers because doesn’t need a lot of care; like commercial software. Its exciting taste has inspired thousands of programmers in writing incredible software, written in the very first ours of a day. Windows for example was written at 5:00 o’clock in the morning, Due to coffee! A result is guaranteed.

It’s said that programmers need coffee to function.

Mountain Dew

Mountain Dew is an essential ingredient for successful computer programming. Mountain Dew is so popular with computer programmers and gamers or anyone else who doesn’t want to sleep.

The Code Red worm was named for the fact that anti-virus software programmers drank Mountain Dew “Code Red” to stay awake while working on the software update that would protect against this threat.

However, some studies have linked drinking soft drinks with risk factors for heart disease, but this study suggests that diet soft drinks sweetened with artificial sweeteners are just as likely to be linked as high calorie drinks sweetened with sugar.

Water

Water – the most useful drink for programmers. Not only is it good for you and will keep your mind off soda/coffee/alcohol…but you’ll start going to the bathroom more often and you’ll burn off a couple of calories walking there!

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4-rules-save-keyboard-from-drinkThe main way you work with data on your computer is through the keyboard. Although it may not seem like a complicated device, it may occasionally have problems and require some maintenance to keep it trouble-free. You can spill some drinks on your keyboard.

Rule Number One to Save Your Keyboard from Drink
Never eat or drink near your computer.

A fast way to ruin your keyboard is to spill some sticky soda on it, so make it a rule not to have food or drink near your keyboard.

If you accidentally spill water on your keyboard, disconnect it and turn it over to drain as much water out as possible. Use a towel to dry what you can and let it air dry for a day or longer, depending upon how much was spilled. Liquids such as soft drinks, juice, and coffee are more serious because they contain sugars and acids that can corrode the inside of your keyboard. An authorized technician might be able to clean your keyboard; do not attempt to take your keyboard apart yourself.

Rule Number Two to Save Your Keyboard from Drink
Never keep any food/drink near your computer desk! And if you do, take safety measures.

Don’t keep drinks or anything else by your computer. If you do that, you’re just asking for a spill to happen. And you know how it goes; the liquid always goes right for the computer instead of the paper and pens you have sitting there.

Rule Number Three to Save Your Keyboard from Drink
Purchase a cover for your keyboard.

To protect your keyboard from dust and spills, purchase a cover. These antistatic, water-repellent covers are generally made of vinyl or slightly more expensive, but more durable, nylon.

Rule Number Four to Save Your Keyboard from Drink
Don’t let your pets walk near your keyboard.

A pet may break the glass with liquid near the keyboard or it may get pissed on by your pet.

An advice to Save Your Keyboard from Drink
Buy revolutionary keyboard that is water resistant, flexible, dust and contaminant proof. The keyboard is ideal for use in industrial environments, hospitals, libraries, marine and boating applications, or anywhere where dust and liquids are present. The silicon-based material is impervious to almost anything – it’s washable, spill-proof, foldable and virtually indestructible.

If you Spilled a drink on your keyboard!

  1. If you spill any liquid in the keyboard, turn it upside down ASAP.
  2. Drain all the water out of the keyboard, shaking it if necessary. If you’ve spilled water into the keyboard, just let it dry. You may use a hair dryer to dry out area under the keys (remember, too much heat and you could damage the electrical components).
  3. If you’ve spilled a soda into the keyboard, completely rinse it in warm water. No soap please! You may use a hair dryer at this point or just let it dry for 2 days.
  4. Ensure the keyboard is perfectly DRY before you attempt to use it again. Don’t plug a wet keyboard into electrical equipment. Think safety.

If, accidentally you happen to spill anything on the keyboard, unplug it first!

And beware, spills typically void a laptop’s warranty, so some owners may find it worth the money to buy an extended warranty or accidental damage coverage that specifically covers drops and spills. Get it from the manufacturer who sold your equipment to you.

Do you have experience of saving you keyboard from drinks?

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juice sportAnyone exhausted from working or playing hard, or who feels in need of a pick-me-up, can boost their energy with sugarcane juice. It provides food energy at a level approximately twice that found in ordinary soft drinks.

Sugarcane juice will be popular with sportsmen and women who are looking to top up their levels of muscle glycogen. Sugarcane juice is a more effective way of replacing this carbohydrate energy than refined sugar-based soft drinks, particularly for endurance training/events. The benefit of sugarcane juice is in providing positive well being and health benefits.

A small study has found that tart cherry juice reduced muscle pain caused by intense exercise as well as strength loss in days immediately after the exercise.

Sports drinks don’t hydrate better than water, but you are more likely to drink larger volumes, which leads to better hydration. The typical sweet-tart taste combination doesn’t quench thirst, so you will keep drinking a sports drink long after water has lost its appeal. An attractive array of colors and flavors are available. You can get a carbohydrate boost from sports drinks, in addition to electrolytes which may be lost from perspiration, but these drinks tend to offer lower calories than juice or soft drinks.

Drinking for sport

If you get dehydrated it can stop you getting the most out of your activity, so it’s important to make sure you drink enough. To help keep you hydrated:

  • Don’t wait until you feel thirsty
  • Drink lots before you start exercising
  • Keep some drink to hand so you can reach it whenever you need it while you’re exercising
  • Drink plenty when you’ve finished

And remember that the fluid we have when we’re exercising should be on top of the usual 1.2 litres (6 to 8 glasses) we need every day to stop us getting dehydrated. If you’re exercising for longer than 1.5 hours, try to eat a high-energy snack such as a banana or some dried fruit before you start or during exercise (if this is practical).

If you can’t manage this, you might find it useful to have some diluted fruit juice or squash to help give you energy. It’s not usually necessary to drink sports drinks just because you’re active. Fruit juice mixed with water, well diluted fruit squashes, or juice drinks will hydrate you and give you some energy. But remember that these, like sports drinks, contain lots of sugar, which means they contain extra calories and can lead to tooth decay.

Warnings about juice for sportsmen

Fruit juice is in its own way a natural energy drink with sugars occurring naturally. However they are pretty concentrated in the natural juice and if you were going to drink the juice for sport activities you should probably dilute it.

juice sport

While sport and juice flavored drinks may sound healthier, they are non-carbonated versions of soda, often with water and high fructose corn syrup as the first 2 ingredients. Even 100% juice drinks are often made with concentrates of pear, apple, and grape and in the end are really water and sugar.

Juice may be nutritious, but it isn’t the best choice for hydration. The fructose, or fruit sugar, reduces the rate of water absorption so cells don’t get hydrated very quickly. Juice is a food in its own right and it’s uncommon for a person to drink sufficient quantities to keep hydrated. Juice has carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes, but it isn’t a great thirst quencher.

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Coffee has played a significant role in human society since the 9th century AD when it was exported out of the Middle East. Today millions of people around the world drink coffee every day because of its social connotations, taste, and caffeine content. With strains from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia, coffee has had a major impact on almost everyone in the world. However, the drink has much more to offer than many people think.

Recent studies by a number of scientific institutions and universities have shown that the innocent looking coffee bean has a number of negative health affects. While research into the full impact that coffee may have on human health is still ongoing, there are findings which are leaving scientists awed. These are listed below.

The negative aspects of coffee

Coffee contains caffeine.
Caffeine causes a number of health problems including, but not limited to, sleep and anxiety disorders, elevated risks of Parkinson’s disease, elevated heart beat and stress, breathing problems in infants, and caffeine dependency syndrome. It is important to drink caffeinated beverages in moderation.

Coffee can cause constipation.
Because coffee is a diuretic it can cause people to become dehydrated; a lack of fluid in an individual’s body causes constipation.

Drinking coffee over a period of time can stain a person’s teeth.
Coffee has a similar affect on teeth as nicotine. Drinking coffee over an extended period of time can lead to an individual developing yellow teeth and cavities, especially if large amounts of sugar are added to the drink.

Daily coffee ingestion induces a 24 hour cyclic disturbance with morning arousal, irritability, difficulty concentrating, subtle levels of disorganization, clumsiness, and forgetfulness. As the day progresses, 3 or more cups later, a heavy fatigue sets in by mid to late afternoon. Further coffee doses may rouse one a bit, but then further collapse is inevitable by evening. Irritability may evolve into disproportionate or inappropriate angry outbursts, pleasure-loss, absence of good-feelings, or empathy anesthesia.

It is likely that the subtle psychopathology of moderate to heavy coffee consumption contributes to the production of unnecessary conflict and dysphasia. The subtle cognitive and memory deficits which appear after coffee intake should alarm employers who expect their employees to think, remember, or carry out skilled, coordinated acts. It may be that coffee facilitates dull, routine, rote tasks where thinking, skill and initiative are unimportant.

A lonely chemist from his R&D department, unwanted, depressed chemist published his invention in a scientific journal, describing the bad effects of coffee on health, hence, the importance of decaffeinating.

He wrote,” Caffeine causes thinning of the bones (osteoporosis), decreases the motility of the sperms, increases irritability and may harm the pregnant mother. Caffeine is habit forming and sudden cessation causes withdrawal symptoms.”

The caffeine, oils and acids in coffee irritate the stomach lining, which can cause excessive production of hydrochloric acid leading to a variety of digestive ailments. Decaf, which contains the same oils and acids as regular coffee as well as traces of ethylene chloride, brings on the same increase in stomach acid.

Drinking coffee on an empty stomach produces an even greater increase in stomach acid, and can cause stomach pain almost immediately in some people.

Research has shown a definite link between coffee drinking and ulcers. One study of 25,000 men showed that those who drink coffee have about a 72 percent higher risk of developing ulcers than those who don’t.

Coffee affects the lower esophageal sphincter which controls the opening between the stomach and the throat. When there is a change in the pressure of this esophageal sphincter, a reflux of stomach acid comes up into the throat causing “heartburn.” Some people already have an abnormality in this sphincter which coffee exacerbates.

Coffee tends to slow down the passage of waste through the small intestine and speed it up in the large intestine.

It is not how much coffee you drink but how long you have been drinking it. If you have been drinking coffee for years, the chronic irritation of your stomach lining can lead to inflammation and pain even if you only drink one or two cups a day.

So you want to quit but want to avoid the withdrawals and impending headache? You may consider consulting with a naturopathic physician on this one.

coffee’s as bad or worse, than nicotine and alcohol. It causes heartburn, excess gas, bloating ulcers, and it is terrible for your digestion. Drinking coffee increases your risk of getting ulcers by 72%! That’s a lot!

If you drink a lot of coffee, and you have digestion problems, stomach pains, or heartburn… Well, what are you waiting for! Stop already!

Side Effects of Caffeine

  • Women who drink caffeinated products lose more calcium in their urine and tend to have less dense bones than non-caffeine drinkers. This may increase the risk of osteoporosis in susceptible women. It has been suggested that women should drink at least one glass of milk a day for every two cups of coffee, to try to offset the calcium loss
  • Caffeine aggravates pre-menstrual breast pain in a significant number of sufferers.
    Caffeine can aggravate insomnia.
  • Women who drink more than four cups of coffee a day have twice the risk of urinary incontinence compared with women who drink little or no coffee.
  • Caffeine withdrawal can produce unpleasant headaches and shakiness.
  • Coffee contains many carcinogens, whether or not it is decaffeinated. There is, however, no strong evidence of an increased risk of cancers in coffee drinkers.
  • Coffee pumps up our stress hormones, and can cause palpitations, a rise in blood pressure and symptoms of anxiety.
  • Caffeine is a diuretic; your body will flush more water than it needs to when you drink coffee and caffeinated soft drinks, so you urinate more frequently and can become dehydrated.
  • Caffeine blocks the naturally occurring chemical, adenosine, from affecting the brain, which prompts the brain to create more adenosine.

Coffee impacts sleep cycles in a couple of different ways; caffeine and tannins can prevent restful sleep. Caffeine can also suppress REM sleep.

Coffee has a number of good and bad health affects. Drinking this bean in moderation should not lead to any problems, but it is always good to know how things will affect you.

But how many cups of coffee do you drink per day?

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Source: WebMD

Diet sodas and other noncalorie and low-calorie foods may be contributing to the childhood obesity epidemic, new research suggests.

The studies involved young rats, not children, but researchers say the findings indicate that eating diet foods early in life may inadvertently lead to overeating and obesity later on.

Juvenile rats in the study fed sweet or salty low-calorie foods over time later overate when fed similar tasting calorie-dense foods, suggesting that the low-calorie foods disrupted the body’s ability to recognize calories and regulate energy intake.

This was especially true among young rats genetically predisposed to become obese.

Researcher W. David Pierce, PhD, acknowledges that extrapolating the findings to human children is a big leap.

But the University of Alberta sociology professor says the rat studies may provide important clues about how early taste conditioning leads to overeating and obesity.

“Our findings suggest that in young children, diet foods may be a poor substitute for healthy foods with sufficient calories to meet energy needs,” he tells WebMD.

Diet Foods and Obesity

The experiments involved 4-week-old juvenile and 8-week-old adolescent rats conditioned to associate particular tastes with caloric content.

This was done by feeding the animals either sweet or salty high-calorie or low-calorie gelatin cubes over the course of 16 days.

When the juvenile rats were later given energy-dense, pre-meal snacks with the same flavor as the low-calorie cubes, they ended up eating more regular food at meal time.

This was not the case with the older rats.

The study is published in the August issue of the journal Obesity.

The findings may help explain previous studies suggesting a link between diet soda consumption and obesity in children, Pierce and colleagues conclude.

“Data from our study indicate that the subversion of the relationship between taste and caloric content disrupts the normal physiological and behavioral energy balance of juvenile rats, resulting in overeating that is independent of genetic disposition for obesity,” they wrote.

The American Beverage Association has said on multiple occasions that soft drinks and diet soft drinks do not cause weight gain. “All of our industry’s beverages — including regular or diet soft drinks — can be part of a healthy way of life when consumed in moderation and as a part of a balanced lifestyle,” they note in news statements.
Diet Expert Weighs In

Childhood obesity expert Goutham Rao, MD, says the rat studies may or may not give insights into how hunger cues relate to energy intake in young children.

Rao, the author of the book, Child Obesity: A Parent’s Guide to a Fit, Trim and Happy Child, does agree that eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is better for young children than eating processed diet foods.

Rao directs the Center for Weight Management and Wellness at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

“Parents often ask me if their children should drink diet sodas,” he tells WebMD. “I tell them that diet soda is better than regular soda, but my preference would be water or low-fat milk.”

He says soft drinks sweetened with sugar and other sugary beverages are among the biggest contributors to childhood obesity in the U.S.

“The solution to the obesity epidemic is simple to understand but hard to implement,” he says. “Avoid sweetened beverages, avoid fast food, limit media time, fit physical activity into the everyday routine, and eat together as a family. If every family did these things there would be very few obese children.”

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In their rush to get only healthy drinks into schools, regulators have been ill-advised, say some drinks makers. Any school caterer serving to school-age teenagers will, from next month, have to follow new rules.

There are new regulations concerning food and drink sold and served within schools, but it’s reasonable to expect that “goodness” in children’s drinks is a subject which will soon spread to other areas of out-of-home catering, even if only as a promotional angle.There is a problem, however – the rules are still not clear, and some people say they are plain wrong.

The School Food Trust has laid down stringent rules for drinks sold in schools for consumption by pupils – apart from water, the only other drinks permitted in school will be milk, pure fruit juices, and yogurt and milk drinks. Drinks made from a combination of these will be allowed, together with low-calorie hot chocolate, tea and coffee. Fizzy and sugary drinks are out.

On the face of it, it’s all well-meaning advice – but even Parliament has now questioned its accuracy. In June, Dr Ashok Kumar, MP for Middlesbrough and East Cleveland, told the House of Commons that, in their enthusiasm to do the right thing, the authorities had missed some aspects of general health.

Big issue

It has been shown that children’s ability to do arithmetic is impaired even if they are only slightly dehydrated, he said – and as 40% of teenage schoolchildren don’t drink the necessary 1.2 litres a day, hydration is a big issue in school. And yet, the School Food Trust guidelines have approved smoothies, because of their fruit content, although they are not good for hydration. On the other hand, low-calorie soft drinks, which can be helpful for hydration, are prohibited for being “fizzy”.

“The ban should be based on the properties of the drinks,” says Kumar. “Smoothies are reasonably calorific and expensive, and are not always a realistic option for hydration allowing low-calorie drinks alongside smoothies would be a better overall approach.”

Several fruit juice companies have said that the MP has done well in illustrating that the rules are well-meaning but wrong. “We’ve followed this closely, and we agree with Dr Kumar,” says Matt Crane, the ‘pure hydration director’ of Juice Doctor, the brand which claims to have invented the category of so-called functional hydration.

This is a concept part-founded by Olympic rowing champion Sir Steve Redgrave, and it holds that not just schoolchildren but three-quarters of the entire UK population are in a state of perpetual dehydration, which is the number-one cause of headaches and daytime fatigue.

As most people dislike drinking plain water, says Juice Doctor, the best remedy is a flavoured beverage which provides hydration, minerals and vitamins. Juice Doctor’s “hydration fix” drinks are based on fruits such as blackcurrant, pomegranate and lemon, with minerals which encourage water to be held in the body for longer.

However, they fail the school guidelines on sugar. “In a very simplistic way, the trust has sought to say that kids should drink water or fruit or dairy,” says Crane. “Smoothies are OK, although we now hear talk of certain smoothie drinks having the same amount of sugar as a Mars bar. By contrast, we’re a juice which uses a very small amount of beet sugar, so we’re ruled out.”

Support for Juice Doctor’s position comes from Frobishers, the fruit juice company which handles a vast amount of supermarket own-brand juicing. There is illogicality in the ruling, says commercial director Ray Tyrrell. “We see that some smoothies are now made from concentrated fruit juices packed with additives and e-numbers – so the rule cannot concentrate on the type of drink,” he says. “It should concentrate on the properties of the drink.”

Among the big names, Britvic has joined the hydration side of the argument with two product moves. One is the launch of The Really Wild Drinks Co, a range of six natural juice drinks available only through vending and over-the-counter sales in schools, and designed to offer more “street-cred” than plain water. “We invested to create an appealing product that secondary school students would want to drink,” says Britvic sales director Andrew Richards. “Our research showed that teenagers thought Really Wild was cool.”

Britvic has also redesigned its Drench bottled water on the same theme, claiming “a new marketing concept – mental hydration”. The pack talks of staying “mentally and physically hydrated all day”, and a future marketing line will be: “Your brain is 75% water – keep it topped up.”

Variety of drinks

The British Soft Drinks Association has also spoken out on the same lines as Kumar. “We would like fluid intake targets to be included in the standards, as children risk the side effects of dehydration,” said its response to the School Food Trust. “Providing children with a variety of drinks to choose from is important.”

Variety is the point which really has been missed, says Richard Canterbury, managing director of Love Smoothies. “The majority of smoothies contain natural fructose, not artificial sweeteners, and give children vital nutrients and vitamins in an easy-to-drink format,” he says. “One of Love Smoothies’ beverages provides 2.5 of the five-a-day [fruit servings] that a child requires, which is something water and cheap carbonate drinks can’t do. So smoothies should be consumed in addition to water, not instead of it, thus giving children both the nutrients and the hydration.”

He adds: “Because smoothies are made from pure fruit, they’re more expensive than we’d like them to be, but we are looking at ways to make them more affordable. And we continue to supply state schools.”

The confusion over sugars and additives in children’s drinks has been most robustly raised by the Big J, the first company to propose a legal definition of a smoothie.

“As there is no definition, cheap impostors have infiltrated the market, charged pure smoothie prices and confused the consumer,” declares managing director Josephine Beach. “A smoothie should adopt the same guidelines as 100% ‘pure’ juice – anything that is added to dilute or artificially enhance is not pure, and should be labelled a ‘smoothie drink’. Today’s consumer knows the difference.”

The Big J has said that it doesn’t need to change any of its products in response to the School Food Trust guidelines, but has launched an aggressive campaign against additives, measuring the contents of several competitor juice drinks and rating them with a skull-and-crossbones mark.

Simplistic rulings are not enough, says the trade, and an example comes from Paul Bendit of Metro Drinks, whose Juice Patrol product has been approved by the Hyperactive Children’s Support Group. Research has shown that 87% of children diagnosed as hyperactive had adverse reactions to artificial colourings, and 72% were sensitive to artificial preservatives. A psychiatrist reports having obtained consistently positive results in treating hyperactive children by removing artificial additives from their diet.

This, says the soft drinks trade, shows just how much there is to think about when laying down the rules.

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Exposing teeth to soft drinks, even for a short period of time, causes dental erosion – and prolonged exposure can lead to significant enamel loss. Root beer products, however, are non-carbonated and do not contain the acids that harm teeth, according to a study in the March/April 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the AGD’s clinical, peer-reviewed journal. That might be something to consider during the next visit to the grocery store.

Root Beer Making from Scratch

You want to make root beer by yourself from scratch? Well, here is how to do it. Do not use sassafras that still has safrole because it is a carcinogen (it causes cancer). The first thing you need to do is gather your roots, barks, and herbs. What do you gather? The Hires root beer recipe is a great source, but there are a couple of items that you must have, and a few that you should have.

Must Have:

  • Vanilla (use real vanilla, but not the bean)
  • Wintergreen

Should Have:

  • Ginger
  • Licorice
  • Sarsaparilla

The actual amounts that you use are up to you, but it is generally an ounce of each ingredient. Wintergreen is the main ingredient used in root beers today, so more Wintergreen and less other ingredients for a post 1960 tasting root beer (2½ oz. Wintergreen ¼ oz. other ingredients). A little later I’ll provide you with a real root beer recipe used in the 1890’s, and it includes exact measurements. When the roots are gathered they should be rinsed in clear water.

All dirt and tops should be removed. Roots that are heavy should be cut or split. When it comes to barks care should be taken that the woody part is removed. The inner skin is the part of the bark that will be used. Herbs & leaves must be gathered when the plant is in seed or flowering stage. When gathering herbs, the plant must be cut where the first leaf begins to branch out. When we state leaves, it is the leaves only that is wanted. After washing, these items should be laid out to dry, and care should be taken so that they are spread out where the air can get around them to prevent molding. Or go buy them at a health food store.

Now just boil the ingredients for about 30 minutes, remove the roots and herbs, and proceed to the fermentation stage described earlier. Vanilla beans contain very tiny seeds, so don’t use the bean unless you’re prepared to filter the liquid first (boiling the bean without slicing it open doesn’t provide enough flavor).

Using Soft Drinks

Consumers often consider soft drinks to be harmless, believing that the only concern is sugar content. Most choose to consume “diet” drinks to alleviate this concern. However, diet drinks contain phosphoric acid and/or citric acid and still cause dental erosion – though considerably less than their sugared counterparts.

“Drinking any type of soft drink poses risk to the health of your teeth,” says AGD spokesperson Kenton Ross, DMD, FAGD. Dr. Ross recommends that patients consume fewer soft drinks by limiting their intake to meals. He also advises patients to drink with a straw, which will reduce soda’s contact with teeth.

Dr. Ross’ patients are shocked to hear that many of the soft drinks they consume are more acidic than battery acid. For example, one type of cola ranked 2.39 on the acid scale, compared to battery acid which is 1.0.

Researchers concluded that non-colas cause a greater amount of erosion than colas. Citric acid is the predominant acid in non-cola drinks and is a major factor in why non-cola drinks are especially erosive. There is a significant difference between sugared and diet colas.

“The bottom line,” Dr. Ross stresses, “is that the acidity in all soft drinks is enough to damage your teeth and should be avoided.”

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