Home Tags Posts tagged with "tooth decay"

tooth decay

0 3866

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

The campaign called GULP – Give Up Loving Pop – has been created by the Health Equalities Group, based in Liverpool, which is supported by the NHS and local authorities.

GULP also highlights links between the drinks and tooth decay and type 2 diabetes.

Sugar has been labelled the ‘new tobacco’ by some health experts, who warn it is fuelling a national obesity epidemic, particularly among children.
A number of campaigning organisations are supporting the idea of a tax on sugary drinks both to reduce consumption and raise money to support health and sports schemes for youngsters.

Recent research by the University of Liverpool claimed that added a 20p tax to the drinks would save thousands of children from diabetes, cancer and heart disease.

They argued such a levy would prevent 1,100 cases of cancer in London alone, as well as reducing the number of people who develop diabetes by 6,300 and cut the number of people suffering from coronary heart disease or strokes by 4,300.

Based on these figures, it seems tens of thousands of cases of disease could be prevented if the 20p per litre tax was adopted across the entire UK.

Over 60 organisations – including Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, British Dietetic Association, CitizensUK, Faculty of Public Health, Netmums and Unison – have already backed the campaign for a sugary drinks tax.

Supporters also include Rosie Boycott, who was appointed by the mayor of London, Boris Johnson, to run the London Food Board.
Soft drinks are the largest single source of sugar for children aged 4-10 years and teenagers.

A tax of 20p a litre would add around 7p to the price of a standard can of Coca-Cola or Pepsi.

Director of the GULP campaign, Robin Ireland, said: ‘Few people fully realise the harm that sugary drinks can do to your health.

‘As well as damaging your teeth, overconsumption of these drinks can lead to weight gain, type 2 diabetes and poor heart health.

‘Given the levels of overweight and obesity across the UK, in particular amongst youngsters, unless we start to take action on sugary drinks we will be storing up problems for future generations.

‘As sugary drinks manufacturers seem less-than-willing to inform the public about the health harms associated with overconsumption of their products we’ve launched our Gulp campaign to get the message across and take the fight to the manufacturers.’

He added: ‘With 40per cent of young people reportedly drinking three or more glasses of sugary drinks per day it is vital that we a send a message to Government about the damage that is being done to the health of our children and young people and the need for education on healthier alternatives.’
However, the director general of the British Soft Drinks Association, Gavin Partington, accused the campaign of ‘scaremongering.’

He said: ‘If these campaigners were genuinely interested in public health they would be seeking to educate all consumers about the importance of a balanced diet and physical exercise rather than erroneously targeting one product category and making claims not supported by the evidence.’

0 3072

Most doctors including Angelo Cuzalina agree that sugar is not good for the overall health, and it is certainly not good for the teeth. These types of drinks are the major culprit for tooth enamel damage, and a new research suggests that these drinks are also bearing the fault for the tooth caries in children.

The results of the research have been published in the Journal of General Dentistry, by consuming energy or sports drinks for only as little as 5 days consecutively, the teeth are already exposed to a high risk of decay and enamel damage. Moreover, the energy drinks have proved twice as harmful for the teeth as the sports drinks.

Jennifer Bone, who is the spokesperson for the Academy of General Dentistry says that quite often, patients come to her office with oral health symptoms such as tooth sensitivity or tooth decay, and they simply cannot find a reasonable answer for these symptoms.

Certainly the dentists make a thorough review of the patient’s everyday diet or snacking habits, and of course they ask the patients about what type of drinks they do consume. The patients are basically stunned to find out that it is the sports drinks or the energy drinks the ones that cause these symptoms in the first place.

Researchers from the Southern Illinois University School of Dentistry have analyzed many different types of sports drinks and energy drinks. According to the findings, the sports and the energy drinks from different brands contain different amounts of acidity levels.

The researchers even put tooth enamel samples into these drinks in order to notice the damage caused by the fizzy beverages. They allowed these samples to be soaked for about 15 minutes, and then soaked the samples in artificially created saliva.

In as few as five days, the researchers could notice quite some damages to the tooth enamel on the samples. Dentists around the world including the dentists from Mt Pleasant Dental highly recommend that people who consume such sports or energy drinks on a regular basis, should always rinse their mouths with water after drinking.

This way, all those bad sugars which will be later transformed into harmful acids by the bacteria, will be flushed away and the damages can be thus avoided.

6 6416

It’s true. Tea has been shown to offer protection to our teeth. Tea is a natural source of fluoride, which is known to protect against tooth decay.

Drinking tea (without added sugar) has been associated with a number of beneficial effects in preventing tooth decay.

Epidemiological surveys have reported that some populations who drink tea on a regular basis have a reduced number of carious teeth. Proposed mechanisms for tea’s oral health benefits include:

Fluoride
The authors concluded that tea was an effective vehicle for delivering fluoride to the oral cavity where it may then become associated with the oral tissues potentially helping to prevent dental decay. Even for adults, whose teeth are fully formed, tea’s fluoride is a great way to protect your teeth. The fluoride found in tea has been shown to inhibit the growth of glucosyltransferase. This substance helps the plaque that naturally forms to adhere to our teeth.

Tannins
Other components of tea may also contribute to the inhibition of caries. It has been reported that the tannins in tea can inhibit salivary amylase thereby reducing the cariogenic potential of starch-containing foods.

Acid erosion
In addition to its beneficial effect on plaque, tannin, along with other components of tea such as catechin, caffeine and tocopherol have been shown to be effective in increasing the acid resistance of tooth enamel.

Flavonoids
Both green and black tea and their specific flavonoids, mainly catechins, have exhibited inhibitory effects on the growth of cariogenic bacteria by preventing the adherence and growth of plaque bacteria at the tooth surface.

So, while black tea is definitely good for you, and is protective to your teeth, for the maximum overall health benefits, get your daily dose of green tea. Many scientists today suggest that for the maximum benefit to your dental health, you combine the two. Both are delicious and refreshing, making a wonderful drink any time of day. It may be one of the simplest ways you can protect your health – and your smile.

One cup of tea contains approximately 0.25 milligrams of fluoride. Fluoride is well known about its positive effect on teeth. One’s daily fluoride need is somewhere between 1.4 and 1.5 milligrams. Thus tea consumption also contributes to meet our fluoride need.

People, who have abandoned their morning cup of coffee for a healthier cup of herbal tea might want to think again, say British researchers. They found that many herbal teas seriously damage teeth by eroding protective enamel.

Drinking herbal teas regularly can erode tooth enamel, according to a new study conducted in the United Kingdom. Paul Brunton and A. Hussain at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester conducted their study with three groups of 21 extracted teeth.

Each set of teeth was dropped into either regular black tea (Typhoo), herbal tea (Twinings’ Blackcurrant, Ginseng and Vanilla tea), or water. The teeth soaked for 14 days, which the investigators determined to be equal to drinking three cups a day for 18 years.

Both the black tea and the herbal tea caused tooth surface loss; however, Brunton and Hussain found that the erosive effect of herbal tea was five times more severe. The findings, published in the November 2001 issue of the Journal of Dentistry, were attributed to the high acid content of the herbal tea.

Another tea study of tea effects found that polyphenols–chemicals found in tea–can help prevent bad breath. Laboratory experiments revealed that polyphenols can retard the bacterial growth that causes bad breath.

Latest Articles

0 2557
Migraines affect more than 36 million Americans – that’s nearly one out of every ten people! It’s also in the top twenty disabilities that cause people to miss work. The thing is, if they all knew this secret to curing and preventing these chronically severe headaches, that number would see a drastic reduction.

Popular Articles

5 57508
Fruit tea - one word describes it - DELICIOUS and HEALTHY. Fruit tea comprised of browned shredded quince which has been oven-dried, dry-grilled until brown, and stored ready to steep in boiling water.

Featured Articles

8 48190

5 57508

1 22875
}